research

Study Finds Allergy-Like Reaction May Trigger Bumps and Pimples

The bumps (papules) and pimples (pustules) of rosacea, a widespread facial disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans, in some instances may be the result of an allergy-like reaction to environmental and emotional triggers, according to new study results presented at the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research workshop during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The seventh annual NRS workshop was attended by more than 130 medical scientists from around the world.

Special Care, New Technology Aid Ocular Rosacea

Special care may be needed for rosacea patients with severe forms of ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Sandra Cremers, instructor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. As part of a National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grant, she recently developed a scoring system to identify severe cases of this rosacea subtype, which may affect half of all rosacea patients.

Breakthrough Study Wins Wide Coverage

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) funded research study on the role of cathelicidins in rosacea (see associated article) was recently published by Yamasaki et al. in Nature Medicine, one of the most prestigious medical scientific journals.1 It not only alerted the medical community to these new findings, but raised public awareness of rosacea through media coverage nationwide.

NRS-Funded Studies Shine Light on Potential New Treatment Advances

Medical scientists reported key results of ongoing research on potential causes of rosacea during the eighth annual rosacea research workshop, sponsored by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). The workshop was conducted during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology, and was attended by more than 100 medical researchers from around the world.

Bacteria in Mites May Cause Rosacea

In a preliminary study presented during a poster session at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting this year, Dr. Richard Burroughs and colleagues of Walter Reed Army Medical Center noted antibiotics may be effective in treating rosacea because of their action against yet-to-be identified bacteria.

New Studies Show High Incidence of Rosacea and Possible New Causes

The incidence of rosacea may be higher than widely believed, according to a preliminary study presented at the recent rosacea research workshop, sponsored by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) during the annual Society for Investigative Dermatology meeting. In addition, an ongoing Irish study found similar prevalence rates of subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea in both indoor and outdoor workers.

Ocular Rosacea Doesn't Rule Out Contact Lenses

Most rosacea patients who exhibit signs and symptoms of ocular rosacea can still safely wear contact lenses, according to a recent article in Review of Ophthalmology by Dr. Mark Mannis, chairman of ophthalmology at the University of California-Davis.1 He emphasized that if eye doctors take steps to minimize inflammation of the eyelid and the eye itself and to stabilize the tear film prior to fitting the lenses, ocular rosacea patients should not suffer any discomfort or damage to the eye surface.

New Laser Study Looks Beneath the Surface of Rosacea

New clues to help unlock the mystery of rosacea were identified in a recent study in which researchers used advanced technology to evaluate the skin of patients successfully treated with pulsed dye lasers (PDL) or intense pulsed light (IPL).

"We are pleased to see interesting findings in this small pilot study that not only help reveal the underlying disease process, but may also provide a basis for developing more targeted therapy in the future," said Dr. Nancy Samolitis, visiting instructor in dermatology at the University of Utah and investigator in the NRS-funded study.

New Research Grants Awarded to Further Knowledge of Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded five new research grants to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially devastating disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

"We are very pleased that a growing number of high-quality research proposals are now being received," said Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the Society's medical advisory board, which reviews each grant application and selects for funding those believed most likely to yield important results.

Possible Rosacea Causes Discussed

Medical experts speaking at a forum called "New Concepts in Rosacea" during the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology discussed the potential vascular origins of rosacea, as well as features that rosacea and adolescent acne (acne vulgaris) -- a separate disorder that sometimes also appears in adults -- may have in common.

Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the National Rosacea Society medical advisory board, reaffirmed his belief that rosacea appears to be primarily a vascular disorder, citing the changes that are most typically seen.

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The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

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