Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Fall 2004

Rosacea Occurs with Seborrheic Dermatitis

According to a new study, rosacea is the most common facial skin disorder overlapping with seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a chronic and recurring inflammatory condition characterized by a red, scaly or itchy rash often found in the creases around the nose, the inner eyebrows or as dandruff on the scalp. Dr. James Del Rosso, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Nevada, found that 26 percent of rosacea patients had facial SD and 28 percent had SD of the scalp.1

Associated Reference

Q&A: How Close to a Cure?

Q. Is there any general medical opinion on how many years away we are from finding a cure for rosacea?

A. No one can predict how long it might take to find and develop a cure for rosacea, but through ongoing medical research significant progress is being made at determining its underlying cause or causes. This is usually the first step in discovering a cure or prevention for a disease.

Scientists Reveal New Advances in Understanding Common Disorder

Medical scientists from around the world reported on their progress in studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to uncover potential causes and other key aspects of the disorder during the fifth annual rosacea research workshop, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The NRS conducts the workshop to promote interest in studying rosacea and to share new information from ongoing studies.

New Survey Shows Rosacea Tends to Evolve Beyond One Subtype

Although rosacea has been classified into four common patterns of signs and symptoms known as subtypes, most rosacea patients experience a progression in their disorder from one subtype to another, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 1,231 rosacea patients, 72 percent reported that their rosacea had evolved from one subtype to another, and 77 percent said they had experienced more than one subtype at the same time.

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