Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Winter 2003

Rosacea Signs May Be Common Beyond the Face

Skin signs of rosacea outside the central face may be more common than is widely recognized, according to a new study presented by Dr. Joel Bamford, associate professor of family practice, University of Minnesota - Duluth, during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

"Almost everyone thinks of rosacea as being a facial condition," Dr. Bamford said. Yet, in a study of 94 patients with rosacea, he found that 42 to 84 percent showed skin signs beyond the face.

Patient Survey Finds Daily Double Hits Facial Cleansing Jackpot

A twice-daily facial cleansing and gentle skin-care routine can help control rosacea, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 1,633 rosacea patients, 78 percent said their facial cleansing routine had helped control their rosacea. Of those surveyed, over 69 percent reported washing their face twice a day and 24 percent said they did it once a day. Most often, 83 percent of the time, facial cleansing was performed at the sink, compared with 39 percent in the shower.

Q&A: Eyes in Winter & Pregnancy

Q. Rosacea seems to affect my eyes more in the winter. Is there anything I can do?

A. Wind and cold temperatures may cause irritation and increase the watery discharge associated with ocular rosacea (eye symptoms)1. Besides limiting time outdoors during winter, patients with ocular rosacea can protect their eyes from icy blasts by wearing ultraviolet protective glasses or sunglasses.

She Is Always Cautious with Her Delicate Skin

Sandra (not her real name) was born with delicate skin. As a result, she was accustomed to being careful and cautious with the things she came in contact with.

"Since childhood I have had sensitive skin," she said. "I am very fair and most over-the-counter products sting and burn so badly I have to immediately rinse them off."

When she developed rosacea just prior to turning 30, it was really no surprise.

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