Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Spring 2021

Masks Matter in Fight Against Disorder Now Affecting 16 Million Americans

While protective face masks may both hide and exacerbate the signs and symptoms of rosacea, the 16 million Americans who suffer from this disorder now have access to more treatment options and sophisticated medical care than ever before. The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to educate the public on this common and potentially serious facial condition, and to urge those who suspect they may have it to see a dermatologist for diagnosis and the most up-to-date therapy.

Study Finds Masks Make Matters Worse for Rosacea

Almost from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, people with acne and rosacea have reported new or worsening symptoms due to long hours wearing protective face masks. Now a study examining mask-related rosacea and acne symptoms, popularly referred to as “maskne,” during the COVID-19 pandemic confirms that not only does prolonged mask-wearing cause them to get worse, but quality of life suffers as well.1

Tips for Avoiding Flare-ups During the Pandemic

For many rosacea patients, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a visible impact on their skin, making special care more important than ever. Here are some tips for avoiding flare-ups during these often stressful times.

Stick to routines: “It’s important to stick to your skin care routine, keep your schedule, and maintain the semblance of a normal life, even if you aren’t going to be leaving the house or working like you might normally,” said dermatologist and psychiatrist Dr. Amy Wechsler.

Studies Find Associations Between Rosacea and Psychiatric Disorders

Editor’s note: Rosacea is a highly visible condition associated with social stigma due to a lack of public awareness and misinformation surrounding its cause. Over the past few years, multiple studies have suggested a connection between rosacea and psychiatric disorders. Additionally, many researchers have noted that rosacea negatively impacts patients’ quality of life. It’s important to separate recent studies concerning psychiatric illnesses, which suggest only a potential association with rosacea, from research gauging the impact rosacea has on patients’ quality of life.

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