Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Fall 2011

New NRS-Funded Studies Open Way for Advances in Treatment

Two recent studies, funded by individual donations to the National Rosacea Society (NRS), have discovered potential key factors in the development of rosacea that open new possibilities for important advances in its treatment and prevention.

A malfunction in part of the body's nervous system may be linked to the redness as well as the bumps and pimples of rosacea, according to a recently completed study by Dr. Akihiko Ikoma and colleagues at the University of California-San Francisco.

Nerve Symptoms May Present New Subset

Individuals with prominent neurologic symptoms might be considered a subset of rosacea, according to a report by Dr. Tiffany Scharschmidt and colleagues at the department of dermatology, University of California-San Francisco.1

In their study of 14 rosacea patients, the researchers found that a high percentage had neurologic (43 percent) or neuropsychiatric (50 percent) conditions such as headaches, depression, essential tremor and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Q&A: Ear Involvement & Intestinal Bacteria

Q. My ears have been weeping and draining for three years. I was diagnosed with ocular and regular rosacea a year ago. Is there such a thing as inner ear rosacea?

A. Rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, but it may also occur on the skin of other parts of the body such as the neck, chest, scalp or ears. However, there is not good evidence in medical literature linking rosacea to symptoms of the inner ear.

Rosacea Review Mailbag Brings Tips from Readers

While medical therapy and lifestyle changes to avoid triggers are the cornerstones of any rosacea treatment plan, many rosacea patients have adopted various measures they believe may help their individual cases. Although what may work for one patient may not work for another, the following are some tips sent to the National Rosacea Society from our readers to share with others.

 

  • "During the pollen seasons, I sometimes use antihistamine eyedrops to control itchiness."

 

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