Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 1998

Swollen Nose Most Common in Males

While a National Rosacea Society survey showed that more women experience rosacea symptoms on the cheeks and chin, the enlargement of the nose is usually seen in men. According to a recent article by Drs. Thomas Jansen and Gerd Plewig in the new medical textbook, Clinical Dermatology, this is the ultimate reaction to rosacea in males.1

Denial Delays Her Diagnosis and Treatment

To this day, Virginia Cox is not sure how she got her first copy of Rosacea Review. One day, it simply seemed to arrive in her mailbox.

"I was shocked," Cox said. "I asked several of my friends if someone had submitted my name, but they said 'no.' Now I know it was really a miracle."

That's because Cox started reading the newsletter and ultimately recognized in herself the disease it described. In her mid-50s, Cox had developed a redness on her cheeks and nose. Yet despite the similarities to rosacea, she initially ignored her gut feelings.

Tips for Surviving a Sizzling Summer

Most people look forward to hot summer days when they can soak in the sun and enjoy a variety of activities outdoors. But for many rosacea sufferers, summer fun can trigger unsightly flare-ups that inevitably put a chill on the season. Here are some precautions you can take:

  • Sun exposure is the most common rosacea tripwire, so wear sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 15 or higher every day -- even when it is overcast. If sunscreen irritates your skin, try a pediatric formulation.

Society Launches Research Grants Program to Increase Medical Knowledge of Rosacea

To increase medical knowledge of rosacea and how to control it, the National Rosacea Society is establishing a research grants program to provide funding for important scientific research on the potential causes and other key aspects of this poorly understood disorder that is wreaking physical and emotional havoc on millions of Americans. The society invites all readers to support this new program by sending a tax-deductible donation along with their Rosacea Review subscription request form.

Q&A: Contagious? & Chlorine

Q. Is rosacea contagious?

A. No. Rosacea is not considered an infectious disease, and there is no evidence that it can be spread by contact with the skin or through inhaling airborne bacteria. The effectiveness of antibiotics against rosacea symptoms is believed to be due to their anti-inflammatory effect, rather than their ability to destroy bacteria.

Subscribe to Summer 1998