Classification of Rosacea

A standard classification system for rosacea was published in 2002 to aid research and clinical diagnosis, and to provide standard terminology. In 2017, a new standard classification and pathophysiology of rosacea has been published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, accompanied by a commentary on rosacea comorbidities and future research. Developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 28 rosacea experts worldwide, the updated system is based on the substantial advances in the understanding of rosacea gained through scientific investigations over the last 15 years.

Visit JAAD.org to read the 2017 standard classification and pathophysiology of rosacea and commentary on rosacea comorbidities and future research online.

Abstracts

In 2002, the National Rosacea Society assembled an expert committee to develop the first standard classification of rosacea. This original classification was intended to be updated as scientific knowledge and clinical experience increased. Over the last 15 years, significant new insights into rosacea's pathogenesis and pathophysiology have emerged, and the disorder is now widely addressed in clinical practice. Growing knowledge of rosacea's pathophysiology has established that a consistent multivariate disease process underlies the various clinical manifestations of this disorder, and the clinical significance of each of these elements is increasing as more is understood. This review proposes an updated standard classification of rosacea that is based on phenotypes linked to our increased understanding of disease pathophysiology. This updated classification is intended to provide clearer parameters to conduct investigations, guide diagnosis, and improve treatment.

Gallo RL, Granstein RD, Kang S, et al. Standard classification and pathophysiology of rosacea: The 2017 update by the National Rosacea Society Expert Committee. J Am Acad Dermatol 2018;78(1):148-155.
doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2017.08.037

Although causal relationships have not been determined, many recent studies have uncovered associations between rosacea and increased risk for a variety of systemic disorders, many with potentially serious outcomes. This might significantly increase the clinical significance of rosacea because evidence that rosacea might be an outcome of systemic inflammation is mounting. In addition, current scientific knowledge has pointed to a variety of promising research avenues that might help further illuminate rosacea's etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical implications.

Gallo RL, Granstein RD, Kang S, et al. Rosacea comorbidities and future research: The 2017 update by the National Rosacea Society Expert Committee. J Am Acad Dermatol 2018;78(1):167-170.
doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2017.06.150

 

 

Click here to view the 2002 standard classification system online, or download the PDF version (requires Acrobat Reader).

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