Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 1999

Laser Removes Visible Veins

A recent controlled study of laser therapy for rosacea found that the procedure substantially reduced visible blood vessels (telangiectasia) and also helped reduce redness (erythema) and flushing after an average of three treatments, according to results presented by Dr. S. M. Clark and colleagues of the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Wales, at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting.

Exercise Often Leaves Sufferers Red In the Face, According to Survey

While a broad range of exercise activities may often aggravate rosacea symptoms, patients are nearly always able to reduce these flare-ups by modifying their exercise routines, according to a survey by the National Rosacea Society.

For most of the 732 respondents, exercise is part of their lifestyle. Forty-two percent reported they exercise frequently and another 34 percent said they exercise daily. But trying to stay healthy doesn't come without a price. For 64 percent of the survey participants, exercise had caused their rosacea to flare up or flare up somewhat.

Sufferers Can't Take Vacation from Steps to Prevent Flare-ups

Your skin looks great and you want to pack light, but before you zip your suitcase make sure you pack any rosacea medication prescribed by your physician, along with a mild cleanser, sunscreen and a hat to shield your face from the sun. Although you can leave town, there is no "taking a vacation" from rosacea.

Successfully managing this chronic disorder -- often characterized by remissions and flare-ups -- usually requires consistent long-term medical therapy as well as lifestyle changes to avoid factors that may aggravate the condition.

Subscribe to Summer 1999