Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Spring 2009

Patient Overcomes Five-Year Break in Medical Therapy

Andrea considered herself somewhat fortunate when she was diagnosed with rosacea about 15 years ago because her doctor worked closely with her to find just the right combination of medications and skin care products for her sensitive skin. The 46-year-old Russian translator from Maryland often stood in front of large crowds when she performed simultaneous interpretations, and she was grateful that she was able to keep her condition under control with oral and topical therapy.

Essential Steps Help Keep Rosacea at Bay

Though rosacea's signs and symptoms may often be unpredictable and frustrating, three basic practices - adherence to medical therapy, avoiding triggers and gentle skin care - can help bring it under control on a long-term basis.

"Patients must first make a strong commitment to long-term medical therapy," said Dr. Boni Elewski, vice chair of dermatology at the University of Alabama - Birmingham.

Rosacea Patients Cite Summer as Season for Most Aggravations

While people often consider the warm weather and endless sun of summer true delights, new survey results suggest that many rosacea patients are likely to describe the season in much less glowing terms.

Nearly 85 percent of the 1,190 respondents to a recent National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey said their condition is affected by the change in seasons, and almost half said their symptoms are at their worst when the warm weather arrives. Forty-six percent also said they have to make the most lifestyle adjustments during this time to reduce the likelihood of a flare-up.

Subscribe to Spring 2009