Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 2007

New Studies Show High Incidence of Rosacea and Possible New Causes

The incidence of rosacea may be higher than widely believed, according to a preliminary study presented at the recent rosacea research workshop, sponsored by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) during the annual Society for Investigative Dermatology meeting. In addition, an ongoing Irish study found similar prevalence rates of subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea in both indoor and outdoor workers.

Tips for Exercising Without Flare-Ups

The increase in body temperature brought about by exercise may lead to a flare-up for many rosacea sufferers. Yet abandoning an exercise routine is not the answer to this dilemma. Here are tips for minimizing exercise-induced flare-ups:

  • Watch the forecast. In warm weather, outdoor exercise should be limited to early morning or evening hours to avoid the midday heat and sun. For activities such as walking or cycling, look for shaded trails instead of hot asphalt. Don't forget to wear sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher).

Facial Care Helps To Control Rosacea

While most rosacea patients know the importance of following their doctor's orders when it comes to daily medication, another critical component of effective rosacea management is often overlooked: an appropriate facial cleansing routine. Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the National Rosacea Society's medical advisory board, advises that people with rosacea should always try to avoid irritation, which may be considered the cornerstone of appropriate facial care for rosacea patients. "The key is to avoid anything that burns, stings or irritates your face," he emphasized.

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