Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Fall 2009

Tips for Managing Stressful Times

Patient surveys have shown that emotional stress is one of the leading triggers of rosacea's signs and symptoms. Especially as we head into the busy holiday season, here are some tips that may help you to cope.

 

  • Learn to say no. Taking on more than you can handle is a sure-fire recipe for stress. Pare down your to-do list by dropping tasks that aren't true necessities.

 

Right Combination of Therapy Keeps Rosacea at Bay

J. Peter Brinker Uys is eager to talk of his success managing his rosacea, but he quickly acknowledges his doctor's role in the story. The 56-year-old investment portfolio manager from Atlanta credits his dermatologist with helping him to find the right combination of products to keep his condition under control.

"I have seen dermatologists since I was 13 and had a severe case of acne," he explained. "When I was about 40, I was diagnosed with rosacea, and over time the acne became less prominent and the rosacea more prominent."

Rosacea Patients May Be Prone to Allergies

Individuals with rosacea may have a greater propensity for allergic reactions, according to a poster presented at the recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.1 Dermatologist Dr. Cheryl Ackerman, in private practice in Glen Ridge, N.J., noted that many of her rosacea patients were found to have allergic reactions to ingredients found in products used on their skin, and these were identified with patch testing.

She noted that in patients with rosacea, symptoms improved after the identified substance was avoided.

 

Q&A: Winter Rosacea & Ocular Rosacea and Contacts

Q. Although I have rosacea, the symptoms only appear in the winter, not during the summer. Is it possible to have "winter rosacea"?

A. While many rosacea patients are affected by environmental factors that change with the seasons, what affects one person may not affect another. It may be that you are particularly sensitive to wind or frigid weather and these winter elements aggravate your rosacea.

Subscribe to Fall 2009