Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Fall 2005

Is It Rosacea -- or Just Sun Damage?

A poster presented at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology by Dr. Ronald Marks, professor emeritus at the University of Wales, raised the question of whether subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea can be distinguished from sun-damaged skin.

Dr. Marks observed that patients with sun-damaged skin often exhibit facial redness and visible blood vessels, which are also symptomatic of subtype 1 rosacea.

Scientists Report New Findings at Rosacea Research Workshop

Medical scientists from around the world heard updated reports on advances in the understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea at the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research workshop held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology in St. Louis. The NRS conducts the annual workshop to promote interest in rosacea research and to share new information from ongoing studies.

Therapy, Lifestyle Bring Successful Rosacea Control

You've been following your doctor's orders for prescribed medical therapy and have made lifestyle changes to avoid trigger factors -- and you look terrific. Then you stop using the therapy and go back to a carefree lifestyle. And your rosacea returns with a vengeance.

"Rosacea is often characterized by remissions and flare-ups," said Dr. Diane Thiboutot, professor of dermatology, Pennsylvania State University.

Subscribe to Fall 2005