Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

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Avoiding Flare-ups Around the House

We often think of flare-ups occurring due to stress or weather, but they can also spring up in the midst of normal day-to-day activities around the home, according to Dr. Estee Williams, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. 

“As a rule, rosacea skin is sensitive skin,” explained Dr. Williams. “Because rosacea skin is so hyper-reactive, it is tough to predict what will set it off. From the moment you wake up to the time you hit the sack, triggers abound.”

New Survey Defines Impact of Rosacea In Social Situations

A new survey conducted by the NRS found that most rosacea patients have experienced some social repercussions due to rosacea’s impact on their facial appearance. 

“Rosacea can have a profound effect on the emotional and social lives of those who suffer from this very visible yet poorly understood condition,” said Samuel Huff, executive director of the NRS. 

Survey Shows Rosacea Patients Often Use More Than One Medical Therapy

As with other chronic disorders that may involve multiple symptoms, a new NRS survey of 1,534 rosacea patients has documented that more than one therapy is often used over the course of managing the condition.

Nearly 80 percent of respondents reported that they had been prescribed more than one medication for their rosacea. Twenty-five percent had been prescribed two medications over the course of treatment, while 22 percent had used three and 29 percent four or more. 

Survey Finds Rosacea Patients Take Care in What They Put on Their Skin

A recent NRS survey found that while most rosacea patients pay attention to the ingredients in the skin-care products and cosmetics they use, for many it’s a process of trial and error to determine what ingredients to avoid in their particular case.

In the survey of 771 rosacea patients, 90 percent of respondents said they read the ingredient labels of skin-care and cosmetic products before purchasing them, and 86 percent said there were specific ingredients they avoid because of their potential to irritate the skin or cause a rosacea flare-up.

Changing Seasons Can Trigger Flare-Ups, New Survey Shows

While each new season brings its own delights, from spring’s blooming flowers to autumn’s falling leaves, the change in weather can also bring challenges to rosacea patients, according to a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey.  Nearly 90 percent of the 852 survey respondents said their rosacea is affected by the change in seasons, and more than 58 percent said their symptoms are at their worst during the summer.

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