Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

medication

Survey Shows Patient Compliance Critical to Controlling Symptoms

A recent patient survey by the National Rosacea Society has documented the importance of compliance with medical therapy, as 88 percent of the respondents said their symptoms reappear or increase in severity if they fail to use their medication as directed.

In the new survey, 74 percent of 658 respondents said they take their rosacea medications as prescribed by their physician. Another 17 percent said they sometimes use their medications as prescribed, and only 9 percent reported they do not follow their doctor's orders.

Q&A: Cooking with Wine & Anti-Inflammatory Medications

Q: Is wine used in cooking, wherein the alcohol has evaporated, still considered a rosacea trigger?

A. It stands to reason that wine may not affect your rosacea if the alcohol is removed in cooking. However, as with all rosacea triggers, what affects one person may not affect another. If wine affects your rosacea, the only way to know for sure whether its residue in cooking is also a trigger is to try it to determine your sensitivity.

Q&A: Four Subtypes & Antidepressants

Q. Will I eventually get all four subtypes of rosacea?

A. The four subtypes of rosacea, designated by the new standard classification system, identify common patterns of signs and symptoms. Individual patients may have all of the signs of a certain subtype, or just some of them. Others may have characteristics of more than one subtype at the same time.

Some Drugs May Worsen Rosacea

Certain medications themselves can trigger or aggravate rosacea signs and symptoms, according to Dr. John Wolf, chairman of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine.

"Rosacea can worsen for some patients from taking vasodilator drugs because of their ability to dilate the blood vessels," he said. "Beta blockers and niacin (vitamin B3) may also cause blood to rush to the face, resulting in a rosacea flare-up."

Q&A: Blood Pressure Medication & How Long Does Rosacea Last?

Q. Is it possible that the medication I am taking for high blood pressure could be aggravating my rosacea?

A. It has been reported that some medications, for example high blood pressure medicines, may precipitate a sudden onset of flushing, which can aggravate rosacea. Be sure to let your dermatologist know of any medications you may be taking for other disorders.

Q. I just learned I have rosacea. How long does this disease last?

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

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