Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

erythematotelangiectatic rosacea

Neuropeptide May Play Role in Pain and Flushing

According to a study funded by the National Rosacea Society, researchers have found a potential connection between the nervous system and the redness and stinging of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea.

Drs. Ferda Cevikbas and Martin Steinhoff, University of California-San Francisco, noted that the flushed face of rosacea is often accompanied by stinging and burning, signs of nerve activation. They theorized this may signal a dysfunction in communication between the nerves and the vascular system.

Subtype 1 Rosacea Needs Special Care

Because the flushing and facial redness of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea are difficult to treat with medical therapy, other measures may be especially important for successfully controlling this widespread form of rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).1

Is It Rosacea -- or Just Sun Damage?

A poster presented at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology by Dr. Ronald Marks, professor emeritus at the University of Wales, raised the question of whether subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea can be distinguished from sun-damaged skin.

Dr. Marks observed that patients with sun-damaged skin often exhibit facial redness and visible blood vessels, which are also symptomatic of subtype 1 rosacea.

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