Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

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Changing Seasons Can Trigger Flare-Ups, New Survey Shows

While each new season brings its own delights, from spring’s blooming flowers to autumn’s falling leaves, the change in weather can also bring challenges to rosacea patients, according to a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey.  Nearly 90 percent of the 852 survey respondents said their rosacea is affected by the change in seasons, and more than 58 percent said their symptoms are at their worst during the summer.

Q&A: Winter Rosacea & Ocular Rosacea and Contacts

Q. Although I have rosacea, the symptoms only appear in the winter, not during the summer. Is it possible to have "winter rosacea"?

A. While many rosacea patients are affected by environmental factors that change with the seasons, what affects one person may not affect another. It may be that you are particularly sensitive to wind or frigid weather and these winter elements aggravate your rosacea.

Rosacea Patients Cite Summer as Season for Most Aggravations

While people often consider the warm weather and endless sun of summer true delights, new survey results suggest that many rosacea patients are likely to describe the season in much less glowing terms.

Nearly 85 percent of the 1,190 respondents to a recent National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey said their condition is affected by the change in seasons, and almost half said their symptoms are at their worst when the warm weather arrives. Forty-six percent also said they have to make the most lifestyle adjustments during this time to reduce the likelihood of a flare-up.

Key Steps Can Soothe Dry Eye in Winter

If you're bothered by irritation, burning or a gritty feeling and redness in your eyes, you're not alone. Winter can bring a host of special challenges for rosacea patients, and the effects of dry eye head the list for many.

"Millions of people suffer from dry eye, and it accounts for 17 percent of all ophthalmologic visits," said Dr. Marian Macsai, chairman of ophthalmology at Northwestern University. "We definitely see more of it during the winter months because of the dryness of the environment, and it often accompanies rosacea."

Tips for Coping with Winter Weather

Some surprises may be welcome during the winter months, but others you want to avoid at all costs -- like rosacea flare-ups. Truth be told, managing rosacea can be especially tricky this time of year, due to many factors. Here are some ways to keep your cool:

 

  • Take care of yourself. Be sure to eat right, rest, exercise, plan sensibly, delegate and leave time to relax. Don't forget to use your "Rosacea Diary" to identify your personal triggers.

     

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