survey

Essential Steps Help Keep Rosacea at Bay

Though rosacea's signs and symptoms may often be unpredictable and frustrating, three basic practices - adherence to medical therapy, avoiding triggers and gentle skin care - can help bring it under control on a long-term basis.

"Patients must first make a strong commitment to long-term medical therapy," said Dr. Boni Elewski, vice chair of dermatology at the University of Alabama - Birmingham.

Many Specialists Provide Care

While rosacea is usually treated by a dermatologist, a new survey by the National Rosacea Society suggests that other health specialists are often the first to notice a patient might have the disorder.

In the survey of 1,584 rosacea patients, 38 percent said a non-dermatologist first noticed their condition and 26 percent were referred to a specialist. Nearly 73 percent of the latter were referred to a dermatologist, and 12 percent were referred to an eye doctor for treatment of ocular rosacea.

Flare-Ups Strike Often, Survey Says

Rosacea has commonly been characterized as a disease of flare-ups and remissions, and data from a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 954 patients confirm that pattern.

More than 55 percent of the respondents said they experience an outbreak or increased intensity of symptoms at least once a month, including 24 percent who noted they have a flare-up every few days, 15 percent who said once a week, and the remainder who said once a month. Another 25 percent said they have a flare-up every few months.

Finding Causes of Rosacea Seen as Most Important to Patients

Areas of rosacea research deemed most important by patients are the potential causes of the skin disorder, followed closely by research on eye symptoms and the progression of the condition, according to a survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Survey Suggests Heredity Plays Part in Development of Rosacea

Rosacea tends to run in families and appears to be especially prevalent among those of northern European descent, according to results of a recent survey of 600 rosacea sufferers conducted by the National Rosacea Society. Nearly 52 percent of those responding to the survey said someone else in their family has or did have rosacea, and 42 percent indicated they were of Irish, German or English ancestry.

Survey Dispels Myth That Rosacea Usually Strikes Between 30 and 50

Results of a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) dispelled the common myth that rosacea usually affects people between the ages of 30 and 50, and also found that new signs and symptoms may develop decades after the initial onset of the condition.

In the NRS survey of 1,391 rosacea patients, only 43 percent said their rosacea first appeared between the ages of 30 and 50, while 39 percent reported that the disorder occurred after age 50 and an additional 17 percent said they developed rosacea prior to age 30.

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Cosmetics Help Appearance in Some But Aggravate Rosacea in Others

The effects of cosmetics on rosacea can vary widely from helping appearance to aggravating the condition, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Among 921 rosacea patients responding to the survey on cosmetics, 30 percent reported that liquid facial foundation helped their appearance, followed by 19 percent who said pressed powder and 17 percent who said cream foundation helped. Another 17 percent reported powder blush helped, while 14 percent said loose powder and 13 percent reported mineral makeup powder improved appearance.

Survey Finds Communications Generally Good with Doctors

A new patient survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) confirmed that communication between doctors and patients is generally good, while suggesting certain opportunities for improvement.

Survey Shows Rosacea's Emotional Toll, Positive Effects of Medical Therapy

Rosacea often casts a negative spell on quality of life and emotional well-being that is in direct proportion to its physical effects, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society. Fortunately, most rosacea patients reported they are able to overcome these drawbacks through effective medical therapy and coping techniques.

New Survey Documents Prevalence of Burning, Stinging and Itching

While the effects of rosacea on facial appearance are widely known, the majority of patients also experience physical discomfort, according to a recent survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 605 rosacea patients, 93 percent said they experienced at least some physical discomfort due to their rosacea. Among those who experienced discomfort, the most common complaints were burning (72 percent), itching (61 percent), stinging (52 percent) and swelling (41 percent).

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.