skin care

Patient Survey Finds Daily Double Hits Facial Cleansing Jackpot

A twice-daily facial cleansing and gentle skin-care routine can help control rosacea, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 1,633 rosacea patients, 78 percent said their facial cleansing routine had helped control their rosacea. Of those surveyed, over 69 percent reported washing their face twice a day and 24 percent said they did it once a day. Most often, 83 percent of the time, facial cleansing was performed at the sink, compared with 39 percent in the shower.

Tips for Savvy Sunscreen Use

Since sun exposure is a common trigger factor for rosacea, proper sun protection may be a key to staying free of flare-ups this summer. Here are tips for using sunscreen this season and all year round.

ASDS Offers Safety Tips for Procedures

The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) has issued consumer safety tips for patients considering treatment involving lasers, light devices, chemical peels, microdermabrasion and other medical procedures, and emphasizes that such services should be performed only by a physician or under direct physician supervision.

Tips for Finding A Day Salon Sensitive to Rosacea

A little personal pampering during and after the hectic holiday season can go a long way toward making you feel good. However, if you plan to visit a day salon for a facial, here are some tips to help make your trip a positive experience.

  • Educate yourself. Call around and find out which salon has licensed aestheticians who have worked with patients with skin conditions such as rosacea.

Sensitive Skin May Require Special Care

Sensitive facial skin has been widely observed as one of the most common features of rosacea. Fortunately, however, this problem can be minimized with medical treatment, special precautions in facial care and avoidance of skin-care products that may cause irritation.

Q&A: Oily T-zone & Testing for Rosacea

Q. I have very large pores and am very oily in the "T" zone of my face. Is this common for rosacea sufferers?

A. There is no standard skin type for rosacea patients. Many sufferers experience dry, flaky skin, while others may have normal or oily skin. The key is to identify your skin type and use medication and skin-care products that are suitable for you.

Survey Shows Effective Skin Care Helps Combat Unsightly Rosacea

Changing one's skin-care routine can go a long way toward relieving the unsightly symptoms of rosacea, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In a recent survey of 1,273 rosacea patients, more than 91 percent said they had modified their skin-care procedures to help control the disorder. Of those who had modified their routines, more than 91 percent reported it had helped improve their condition.

Skin Care Can Aid Therapy

Incorporating topical therapy into a consistent and gentle skin-care routine can improve the overall effectiveness of therapy for rosacea patients, according to an article in The Nurse Practitioner.1

Skin Care Routine May Aid Long-Term Therapy

Complying with long-term medical therapy may appear to be a demanding commitment. However, many rosacea patients have found that incorporating topical therapy into a twice-daily facial care routine is a painless and efficient way to comply with doctor's orders.1 In fact, the soothing regimen necessary to avoid irritating the facial skin or causing flushing can be a refuge of calm during a busy day.

Q&A: Indoor Temperature & Dry, Flaky Skin

Q. Can indoor temperature affect my rosacea?

A. It is possible that indoor temperature could affect rosacea in certain cases, since anything that causes a sufferer to flush may have the potential to lead to a flare-up. Hot weather has been documented on surveys as a rosacea trigger for 53 percent of sufferers, and being "too warm" indoors can also induce flushing.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.