research

Study Shows Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and Rosacea

A recent study in the European Journal of Dermatology investigated the possible connection between rosacea and insulin resistance.

Researchers Find Potential Link Between Rosacea and Gastrointestinal Disorders

Researchers conducting a nationwide study in Denmark found that rosacea may be associated with increased risk of certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, but whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship is unknown.

NRS Announces 2016 Research Grant Award Recipients

The National Rosacea Society has awarded funding for three new studies, in addition to continuing support for two ongoing studies, as part of its research grants program. The purpose of the grant program is to increase knowledge and understanding of the causes and other key aspects of rosacea that may lead to improvements in its management, prevention or potential cure.

New Ocular Rosacea Studies Help Define Disease Process

Two recent small studies on ocular rosacea yielded new findings that help in understanding its manifestations as well as the disease process.

Researchers at Kirikkale University in Turkey found that despite a high incidence of dry eye in individuals with rosacea, corneal and conjunctival sensitivity were not significantly different from those of the eyes of individuals without the disorder. This is the first time to their knowledge that such a study has been conducted.1

New Research on Comorbidities Extends Scientific Knowledge

The surge of scientific studies linking rosacea and a wide variety of other medical disorders, called comorbidities, may have been inspired by similar findings about another skin disorder, according to Dr. Sewon Kang, chairman of dermatology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a member of the NRS Medical Advisory Board.

Computers May Be Used to Evaluate Facial Redness

Physicians and researchers may soon have a new computer-based process to help objectively assess the redness of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea, according to a recent report by researchers from the University of California-Davis.

Right now, the redness of rosacea is typically assessed visually by dermatologists using various scales to evaluate severity, such as the Clinician’s Erythema Assessment, a standard scale that has been demonstrated to be reliable in determining agreement among visual evaluations. Current assessments may also be assisted by photography.

Molecular Insight May Lead to New Advances in Rosacea Treatment

Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), a family of proteases recently identified as having a possible role in the development of rosacea, may help provide a pathway to controlling rosacea’s signs and symptoms, according to an article by Drs. Jan Fischer and Ulf Meyer-Hoffert of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany in the journal Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Researcher Suggests Rosacea May Be the Result of a Protective Mutation

A researcher in Germany has proposed a novel unifying theory that may explain the molecular origin of rosacea in terms of climate adaptation. He contends that the new concept may not only explain why the disorder’s known triggers can cause flare-ups, but is also consistent with known therapeutic activity against rosacea’s signs and symptoms.

Study Finds Environmental & Genetic Factors in Rosacea

Genetics have long been thought to play a role in rosacea, but researchers have yet to isolate their influence. In one of the first studies of rosacea to measure and define genetic and environmental contributions, Dr. Daniel Popkin, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University, and colleagues have found that genetics and environmental factors may contribute equally to the disorder.

Early Analysis Finds Potential Risk Increase for Certain Types of Cancer

A recent analysis of a long-term health study of female nurses in the U.S. showed that there may be a potential for increased risk of thyroid cancer and the skin cancer basal cell carcinoma in rosacea patients, according to a recent report by Dr. Wen-Qing Li and colleagues in the British Journal of Cancer.

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The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

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