Q&A

Q&A: Oily T-zone & Testing for Rosacea

Q. I have very large pores and am very oily in the "T" zone of my face. Is this common for rosacea sufferers?

A. There is no standard skin type for rosacea patients. Many sufferers experience dry, flaky skin, while others may have normal or oily skin. The key is to identify your skin type and use medication and skin-care products that are suitable for you.

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

Q&A: Visible Blood Vessels & Active Ingredients

Q. I've been using medication for some time now and it has cleared my pimples and reduced my redness, but it also seems to have made me develop more spider veins. What's going on?

Q&A: Longevity of Symptoms & Computer Trigger

Q. I have had rosacea for three years now. Are there any statistics that indicate how long the condition will last?

Q&A: Pimples on Lips & Sweating

Q. I suffer from bumps or pimples that aggravate my lips. Is this caused by my rosacea?

Q&A: Mosquito Bite-like Flare-ups & Steroid Treatment

Q. Sometimes my rosacea flare-ups look like mosquito bites and itch. Is this common?

A. A rosacea flare-up is characterized by a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples. For some sufferers, the bumps caused by rosacea may resemble mosquito bites. For others, these bumps are generally redder in appearance. It is not uncommon for rosacea patients to itch from dry skin, which can be helped by using a moisturizer.

 

Q&A: Anxiety & Time from Trigger to Flare-up

Q. Can being anxious or nervous contribute to a rosacea flare-up? I do a lot of public speaking and find my face sometimes gets red and swollen before an engagement.

A. Since anxiety and nervousness are forms of emotional stress, it's quite likely that the anticipation of your speaking engagement could result in a rosacea flare-up. In a National Rosacea Society survey of 602 patients, 88 percent said their rosacea often or sometimes flares up when they are under emotional stress.

Q&A: Ears are Burning & Asymetrical Symptoms

Q. Sometimes my flushing is so severe, my ears feel hot and burn. Is this part of rosacea?

A. Rosacea patients flush more frequently than the general population, and in some cases this flushing might include the ears. Adults who are prone to blush and flush are at greater risk of developing rosacea, and prolonged flushing leading to persistent redness in the face is an early symptom.

Q&A: Having the Talk & Mild Case

Q. I have had rosacea for several years and now I've noticed that one of my cousins looks as though she has symptoms of the disease. How do you tell someone you think they have rosacea?

Q&A: Contagious? & Chlorine

Q. Is rosacea contagious?

A. No. Rosacea is not considered an infectious disease, and there is no evidence that it can be spread by contact with the skin or through inhaling airborne bacteria. The effectiveness of antibiotics against rosacea symptoms is believed to be due to their anti-inflammatory effect, rather than their ability to destroy bacteria.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.