Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

heredity

Q&A: Chronic Nasal Blockage & Heredity

Q. Is there a link between chronic nasal blockage and rosacea?

A. Chronic nasal obstruction has many potential causes, and there is no evidence linking this condition to rosacea. Even patients with rhinophyma usually can breathe well through their noses. A typical stuffy nose is commonly associated with inflammation of the mucous membranes from various causes, often allergies or viruses.

Study Finds Rosacea Is Common in Baltic Nation

A recent study in Estonia of 348 randomly selected workers over 30 years of age found that 22 percent had one or more primary features of rosacea,1 as identified in the standard classification system developed by the National Rosacea Society consensus committee and review panel of rosacea experts. The Slavic nation is located off the eastern Baltic Sea.

Reference

  1. Abrams K, Silm H, Oona M. Prevalence of rosacea in an Estonian working population using a standard classification. Acta Derm Venereol 2010;90:269-273.

Survey Suggests Heredity Plays Part in Development of Rosacea

Rosacea tends to run in families and appears to be especially prevalent among those of northern European descent, according to results of a recent survey of 600 rosacea sufferers conducted by the National Rosacea Society. Nearly 52 percent of those responding to the survey said someone else in their family has or did have rosacea, and 42 percent indicated they were of Irish, German or English ancestry.

Q&A: Scalp Symptoms & Preventive Measures

Q. Not only do I have rosacea on my face, but I also have symptoms on my scalp. Is this common and how should it be treated?

A. While rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, it may also appear in other areas. In a survey of rosacea patients, signs and symptoms were reported by 15 percent of the respondents on the neck, 6 percent on the chest, 5 percent on the scalp and 4 percent on the ears.

Rosacea among Family Members Suggests Heredity

Some individuals may be genetically predisposed to develop rosacea, according to results of a study to determine whether rosacea patients had a family history of the disorder and whether they came from a particular ancestral community of origin. The results were reported in a poster presentation by Dr. Wayne Guliver, chairman of dermatology, and other researchers at Memorial University of Newfoundland during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1

Will Your Children Have Rosacea?

Having children follow in their footsteps can be the ultimate satisfaction for many parents, but not in the case of rosacea. Evidence suggests that heredity may indeed play a role in the development of this disorder, and that the children and other relatives of rosacea sufferers would be wise to be on the lookout for early signs as they grow older in order to seek diagnosis and treatment before the condition reaches more advanced stages.

New Evidence Shows Rosacea May Be Linked to Heredity

A recent survey of 2,052 rosacea sufferers conducted by the National Rosacea Society provides evidence that this chronic skin condition runs in families, and that people of some nationalities are more likely than others to develop the disorder.

Nearly 40 percent of the respondents indicated they had a family member who also suffered from rosacea. For 27 percent, that family member was a parent. Eighteen percent had a brother or sister suffering from rosacea, while 13 percent had a grandparent with the disease and 16 percent had an aunt or uncle who was affected.

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