Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

alcohol

Dispelling the Myth of Wine and Noses

Before the advent of modern medicine, it was commonly believed that rosacea was a side effect of excessive drinking. Today, of course, we know that rosacea is not a symptom of alcoholism, nor is there any reason to think that people with rosacea necessarily drink more than the average adult — in fact, even a teetotaler may have the condition. 

Yet despite the increased information and awareness about rosacea, the misconception persists. Ruddy cheeks and bumps and pimples were even used in the recent film Girl on the Train to telegraph the protagonist’s struggle with alcohol. 

Tips for Controlling Alcohol Flare-Ups

While beer, wine or cocktails may play a role in many social events, rosacea patients who are prone to alcohol-related flare-ups often feel vulnerable when it comes time to raise a toast.  Here are some tips to help you feel more at ease when the drinks are flowing freely.

•  Avoid red wine.  Red wine and rosacea flare-ups go hand-in-hand for many sufferers and the best way to lessen the effects is to avoid it.

Q&A: Cooking with Wine & Anti-Inflammatory Medications

Q: Is wine used in cooking, wherein the alcohol has evaporated, still considered a rosacea trigger?

A. It stands to reason that wine may not affect your rosacea if the alcohol is removed in cooking. However, as with all rosacea triggers, what affects one person may not affect another. If wine affects your rosacea, the only way to know for sure whether its residue in cooking is also a trigger is to try it to determine your sensitivity.

Survey Lists Wine as Top Alcohol Trigger

A new survey by the National Rosacea Society found that certain alcoholic beverages may affect rosacea more than others, while also dispelling the common myth that the condition is caused by heavy drinking.

In the survey of more than 700 rosacea patients, 10 percent of the respondents said they rarely or never drank alcohol, and an additional 10 percent reported that consuming alcoholic beverages had no affect on their disorder.

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