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Immune System May Trigger Onset of Rosacea Symptoms

Whether certain proteins made by the immune system may trigger the onset of rosacea is the subject of a study sponsored by a National Rosacea Society research grant and conducted by Dr. Richard Gallo, associate professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the University of California - San Diego and Dr. Masamoto Murakami, postdoctoral scientist, Veterans Medical Research Center. While acting to protect the body, the proteins also may trigger some of rosacea's symptoms, the researchers hypothesize.

Some Drugs May Worsen Rosacea

Certain medications themselves can trigger or aggravate rosacea signs and symptoms, according to Dr. John Wolf, chairman of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine.

"Rosacea can worsen for some patients from taking vasodilator drugs because of their ability to dilate the blood vessels," he said. "Beta blockers and niacin (vitamin B3) may also cause blood to rush to the face, resulting in a rosacea flare-up."

Rosacea Affects Skin of Color

While rosacea is thought to be most common in fair-skinned individuals, it may simply be more difficult to diagnose in those of African American, Asian and Hispanic heritage, said Dr. Fran Cook-Bolden, associate director, The Skin of Color Center, St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City, during a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Research Grants Awarded to Study Common but Little-Known Disorder

The National Rosacea Society announced that new studies of rosacea have been selected for funding as part of its research grants program to support the advancement of scientific knowledge of this poorly understood and often life-disruptive facial disorder.

Study Shows Sun May Affect Blood Vessels

Sun exposure appears to trigger a substance in the body that may lead to the visible blood vessels that often appear with rosacea, according to research funded by the National Rosacea Society and reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

"Our initial study showed that sunlight may indeed have a role in causing rosacea," said Dr. Marita Kosmadaki, research fellow, Department of Dermatology, Boston University, who presented results of her research with Dr. Mina Yaar, professor of dermatology at Boston University.

Researchers Report Progress in Search for Rosacea's Causes

Medical scientists reported significant progress in uncovering the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea during the National Rosacea Society's third annual research workshop, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. More than 130 researchers heard results of ongoing studies funded by the National Rosacea Society, and discussed the need for further scientific investigation into this highly prevalent disorder.

Rosacea among Family Members Suggests Heredity

Some individuals may be genetically predisposed to develop rosacea, according to results of a study to determine whether rosacea patients had a family history of the disorder and whether they came from a particular ancestral community of origin. The results were reported in a poster presentation by Dr. Wayne Guliver, chairman of dermatology, and other researchers at Memorial University of Newfoundland during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1

Study Links Rosacea, High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure may occur more frequently in rosacea patients, according to a recent study by Dr. Aditya Gupta, associate professor, Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto, presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

H. pylori May Not Be a Rosacea Factor

A recent study suggested that treatment of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium associated with peptic ulcers and other gastric disorders, may benefit the often small portion of rosacea patients who harbor this infection. However, another study has found that H. pylori itself does not appear to be a major factor.

Research Grants Awarded to Find Causes of Poorly Understood Disorder

The National Rosacea Society announced that four new studies of rosacea have been selected for funding as part of its research grants program to encourage and support the advancement of scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood facial disorder.

"We are pleased that the number of grant applications has continued to increase since the awarding of the first grants from this important new program last year," said Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the Society's medical advisory board, which reviewed and selected the grant applications for funding.

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The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

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