Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 2001

Stress Control Cuts Rosacea Symptoms, According to New Patient Survey

While emotional stress is one of the leading causes of rosacea flare-ups, stress management can be highly effective in reducing its impact, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

In a survey of more than 700 rosacea patients, 91 percent reported that emotional stress caused or sometimes caused their rosacea to flare up. Stress reportedly led to frequent flare-ups for 45 percent of the survey respondents and occasional flare-ups for 42 percent. Only 10 percent indicated that stress rarely affected their rosacea.

When Her Tan Faded, She Had Suspicious Red Patches

It wasn't until her tan disappeared that Karin van der Valk noticed the suspicious red patches on her left cheek.

"I thought it was sunburn, but when my tan was all gone in the winter, I realized the red patches were quite prominent," she said.

It took her a while to discover the cause of the redness. "I also have asthma and allergies, and tend to break out in red patches when I'm suffering an attack," she said.

Sun Protection May Require Proper Sunscreen

While sun exposure is one of the most common trigger factors for flare-ups, finding a sunscreen that does not irritate the face can be a challenge for many rosacea sufferers.

"Individuals with rosacea are often uniquely sensitive to topical preparations applied to the face," said Dr. Mark Lebwohl, chairman of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. "For this reason, attention to ingredients can help patients find products that work best for them."

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