Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Winter 1996

H. pylori Might or Might Not Trigger Rosacea

Limited studies have suggested that a bacterium commonly associated with peptic ulcers and other gastric disorders, called Helicobacter pylori, may play a role in triggering rosacea in some patients.

Evidence of H. pylori was found in 19 of 20 rosacea patients in one study and in 26 of 31 rosacea patients in another, according to Dr. Richard B. Odom, chairman of dermatology at the University of California at San Francisco.

Patients Who Follow Directions Achieve High Rate of Success

Rosacea sufferers who follow their doctor's orders regarding medical therapy and also make appropriate lifestyle modifications achieve a high rate of success in controlling their condition, according to a recent survey of Rosacea Review readers.

In the survey of 520 rosacea patients, 51 percent were under treatment with topical therapy alone and 34 percent were using a combination of both oral and topical antibiotics. Only 11 percent had been prescribed oral antibiotic tablets alone.

Selecting Cosmetic Products

You don't have to feel like hiding your face the moment your rosacea flares up. Many makeup products, available through the popular cosmetic lines, can help camouflage redness and pimples. Here are some general guidelines for selecting cosmetic products.

  • Choose water-based moisturizers and light, oil-free makeup products.

  • Try a color-correcting prefoundation base in shades of yellow or green to counter redness, or makeup with natural yellow tones. Avoid makeup with pink or orange hues.

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