Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Spring 2004

She Finds Rosacea Widely Misunderstood in India

Homai Baria of India felt quite alone when she was diagnosed with rosacea.

"In India, I have still not heard much about the term rosacea," Baria said. As a result, many people in her country don't understand her condition.

"My family, friends and colleagues at work would sometimes make unkind comments about what was happening to me," she said, referring to her red face and rosacea flareups. "I went to the point of avoiding going to parties and social gatherings. I would often cry when I was alone."

Household Cleaners and Chores Can Trigger Rosacea Flare-ups

A broad variety of common household tasks and products may aggravate rosacea in various individuals, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society. The survey of nearly 400 rosacea patients found that harsh chemicals in cleansers and tasks requiring strenuous physical exertion may help make the house sparkle, but they can also lead to rosacea flare-ups.

Study Finds Most Common Effects of Ocular Rosacea

A recent study by researchers at the University of California, Davis identified the most common eye effects of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea found by ophthalmologists during patient examinations.1

In the study of 88 ocular rosacea patients, 85 percent had meibomian gland dysfunction. These glands secrete a fatty substance that helps keep the eye from drying out, and plugging of these glands may result in dry eye or styes.

Subscribe to Spring 2004