Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Spring 2001

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

Her 'High Color' Face Turned Out to Be Rosacea

It was the network of visible blood vessels on her face that bothered Rita Edwards the most. As a frequent blusher, she was accustomed to having "high color" on her face, but this was more than she could bear.

"They made my face look purple-red," she said. "I also had dry, bumpy skin, almost like acne."

Even though she doesn't like to wear makeup, Rita tried foundations and creams to cover her blemishes, redness and blood vessels. "But they just couldn't be covered," Rita said.

"People would ask me what was wrong when my face got red," she said.

Rosacea Awareness Month Targets Millions Who Are Left Untreated

Although the physical and emotional turmoil suffered by many of the estimated 14 million Americans with rosacea has been well documented, medical data indicate that less than 10 percent are receiving treatment for the disease. March has been designated Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society to encourage those who suffer from this conspicuous and often life-disruptive facial disorder to seek medical help before it reaches advanced stages.

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