Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 2005

Tips for Enjoying Summertime Foods and Beverages

As summer heats up, more people are firing up the grill or pulling out the picnic basket. Here are some tips on ways to keep rosacea flare-ups under control while still enjoying an outdoor meal.

  • Watch out for hot or spicy foods, which may cause flare-ups in many rosacea sufferers. Choose mild or fruit salsas, mild sausages instead of hot and watch the seasoning spices. Opt for seasoning with fresh herbs instead of anything in the pepper family.

     

Rosacea Often Affects Patients' Social Lives, New Survey Finds

While even mild cases of rosacea can be a nuisance, this widespread disorder increasingly interferes with patients' social lives when it becomes more severe, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 660 rosacea patients, 86 percent of those with severe rosacea said the condition had inhibited their social lives and 67 percent of those with moderate rosacea were also affected, compared with 38 percent of mild cases.

Smart Sun Protection Keeps Flare-Ups Away

While many are aware that protection from sunlight is important to prevent skin cancer, rosacea patients have even further reason to minimize their exposure. In fact, beyond being the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups named by 81 percent of patients in a National Rosacea Society survey, researchers have found that sun exposure may be linked to the visible blood vessels (telangiectasia) often associated with rosacea.

Tears May Mark Ocular Rosacea

Preliminary data from a study funded by the National Rosacea Society have found that the tears of rosacea patients contain different proteins than the tears of people without rosacea. The results point to the potential for a screening test for ocular rosacea in the future.

The study, "Tear Proteins in Patients with Rosacea," is being conducted by a team led by Dr. Mark J. Mannis, chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of California - Davis.

Subscribe to Summer 2005