Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 2003

Q&A: Scalp Symptoms & Preventive Measures

Q. Not only do I have rosacea on my face, but I also have symptoms on my scalp. Is this common and how should it be treated?

A. While rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, it may also appear in other areas. In a survey of rosacea patients, signs and symptoms were reported by 15 percent of the respondents on the neck, 6 percent on the chest, 5 percent on the scalp and 4 percent on the ears.

Lifestyle Management Helps Patients Enjoy Summer While Reducing Flare-ups

Nobody likes to be on the hot seat. Yet that's where many with rosacea may find themselves this summer unless they take special care to prevent the common rosacea pitfalls of the hot season.

"The sun and hot weather both tend to exacerbate rosacea, and can make outdoor activities especially challenging for people with this condition," said Dr. James Del Rosso, assistant clinical professor of dermatology, University of Nevada School of Medicine. "Fortunately, there are steps that can be taken to minimize these effects."

Through Study, She Catches Eye Symptoms Early

Ramona McDaniels had no knowledge of rosacea when her symptoms first appeared. When her face began to flush frequently, with the redness lasting longer each time, she suspected everything and anything.

"I tried to figure it out," McDaniels said. "Everything under the sun was suspect. I thought it might be my makeup, allergies, foods, the sun."

The list of potential culprits grew until one day her mother read an article about rosacea. "She looked at me and said, 'This is what you have.'"

Mite Infestation Mimics Rosacea

A severe infestation of microscopic skin mites may mimic rosacea but fail to respond to standard therapy, according to a presentation by Dr. Martin Schaller, assistant professor of dermatology at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

The tiny mites, known as Demodex folliculorum, are normal inhabitants of human skin. Studies have found an elevated incidence of Demodex in rosacea patients, but it is uncertain whether this is a contributing factor or a result of the disorder.

Subscribe to Summer 2003