Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 2002

New Survey Pinpoints Leading Factors that Trigger Symptoms

Without special precautions, you may be heading for a flare-up this summer as sun, stress and hot weather were cited as the most common rosacea tripwires in a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society. The survey of 1,066 rosacea patients provides the most comprehensive ranking to date of the multitude of things that may trigger or aggravate the signs and symptoms of rosacea in various individuals.

Ignoring Doctor's Orders Leads to Rhinophyma

Joseph Sheehan may be a thick-skinned individual, but when his rosacea got out of control, it was more than he could bear.

Sheehan, a naval architect who teaches ship design, developed rosacea around 60. "At first it was basically just a redness, and oily skin around the nose," he said.

He tried a few home remedies and lived with the symptoms for about a year. Finally, he saw a dermatologist.

"He prescribed an oral antibiotic, but I didn't like the idea of having to use it indefinitely," Sheehan said. "So I never took it."

Eye Symptoms Call for Special Care

Red eyes often go hand in hand with red faces for many people with rosacea, as many develop the ocular form of the disorder in addition to facial symptoms. Fortunately, the effects of ocular rosacea can be successfully controlled with medical help and appropriate eye care.

In a recent National Rosacea Society survey, 61 percent of nearly 1,400 respondents said they had suffered eye symptoms such as a watery or bloodshot appearance, a gritty feeling, or burning or itching.

Rosacea among Family Members Suggests Heredity

Some individuals may be genetically predisposed to develop rosacea, according to results of a study to determine whether rosacea patients had a family history of the disorder and whether they came from a particular ancestral community of origin. The results were reported in a poster presentation by Dr. Wayne Guliver, chairman of dermatology, and other researchers at Memorial University of Newfoundland during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1

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