Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

Summer 1997

Managing Flare-ups on Social Occasions

"Looking good" isn't just a concern of the young. Mature adults also want to make a good impression, and even those firmly established in long-term social relationships want to be at their best for social occasions.

Here are tips on how to avoid or cope with a flare-up that could imperil your social life.

  • Be prepared. In the days before special occasions, take particular care to avoid lifestyle factors that affect your individual condition. Also be sure to use all medication as prescribed in the weeks before.

New Booklet Helps Cope with Rosacea Lifestyle Factors

Rosacea sufferers have achieved considerable success controlling their rosacea when they combine medical therapy with control of lifestyle factors that aggravate their individual conditions. Now a new booklet has been published by the National Rosacea Society to help simplify this process.

Called "Coping with Rosacea: Tips on Lifestyle Management for Rosacea Sufferers," the booklet is a handy guide for overcoming the most common tripwires that may affect rosacea sufferers.

Long-Term Topical Therapy Can Halt Flare-ups

Long-term treatment with topical medication alone was found to effectively keep rosacea at bay in a multicenter clinical study reported at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

In the study, after being successfully treated with a combination of oral and topical antibiotics to bring their rosacea under initial control, 88 rosacea sufferers were randomly assigned to use alone either a topical antibiotic or the same topical gel without the antibiotic (placebo) twice daily for six months.

Subscribe to Summer 1997