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ATP May Play Key Role in Rosacea

Results from previous research funded by the National Rosacea Society have led investigators Dr. Richard Granstein and colleagues at the Cornell University Medical School to focus in their current study on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a natural substance in the body that may play a key role in the flushing, telangiectasia and bumps and pimples of rosacea.

H. pylori Linked to Inflammation

According to a pilot study published in the medical journal Acta Dermato-Venereologica by Dr. Camilo Diaz and colleagues in England, there may be a relationship between the bumps (papules) and pimples (pustules) of subtype 2 rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.1

Research Grants Awarded to Study Causes of Little-Known Disorder

The National Rosacea Society announced that five new studies have been awarded funding as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

Rosacea Occurs with Seborrheic Dermatitis

According to a new study, rosacea is the most common facial skin disorder overlapping with seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a chronic and recurring inflammatory condition characterized by a red, scaly or itchy rash often found in the creases around the nose, the inner eyebrows or as dandruff on the scalp. Dr. James Del Rosso, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Nevada, found that 26 percent of rosacea patients had facial SD and 28 percent had SD of the scalp.1

Associated Reference

New System Introduced for Assessing Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society has introduced the first standard grading system for the study and clinical assessment of rosacea, developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 17 rosacea experts worldwide and recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.1

Scientists Reveal New Advances in Understanding Common Disorder

Medical scientists from around the world reported on their progress in studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to uncover potential causes and other key aspects of the disorder during the fifth annual rosacea research workshop, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The NRS conducts the workshop to promote interest in studying rosacea and to share new information from ongoing studies.

Study Finds Most Common Effects of Ocular Rosacea

A recent study by researchers at the University of California, Davis identified the most common eye effects of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea found by ophthalmologists during patient examinations.1

In the study of 88 ocular rosacea patients, 85 percent had meibomian gland dysfunction. These glands secrete a fatty substance that helps keep the eye from drying out, and plugging of these glands may result in dry eye or styes.

Rosacea Signs May Be Common Beyond the Face

Skin signs of rosacea outside the central face may be more common than is widely recognized, according to a new study presented by Dr. Joel Bamford, associate professor of family practice, University of Minnesota - Duluth, during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

"Almost everyone thinks of rosacea as being a facial condition," Dr. Bamford said. Yet, in a study of 94 patients with rosacea, he found that 42 to 84 percent showed skin signs beyond the face.

New Research Grants Awarded to Advance Knowledge of Rosacea

Five new studies of rosacea have been awarded funding as part of the National Rosacea Society's research grants program to advance scientific and medical understanding of this widespread but poorly understood facial disorder, estimated to affect 14 million Americans.

Medical Scientists Report Advances in Uncovering Mysteries of Rosacea

Researchers reported on continuing progress in the study of potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea during the National Rosacea Society's fourth annual research workshop, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

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Email:
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National Rosacea Society
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Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.