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Research Grants Awarded to Find Causes of Poorly Understood Disorder

The National Rosacea Society announced that four new studies of rosacea have been selected for funding as part of its research grants program to encourage and support the advancement of scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood facial disorder.

"We are pleased that the number of grant applications has continued to increase since the awarding of the first grants from this important new program last year," said Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the Society's medical advisory board, which reviewed and selected the grant applications for funding.

New Study Links Warmer Skin to Rosacea Bumps and Pimples

The greater warmth of the facial skin of rosacea sufferers may play a role in triggering the unsightly bumps and pimples that are common signs of this disorder, according to a new study funded by a grant from the National Rosacea Society and reported at the recent annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

Medical Scientists Report Advances During Rosacea Research Workshop

Medical scientists reported significant progress in exploring the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea during a recent research workshop organized by the National Rosacea Society.

The session was attended by more than 70 researchers, and was held for the second year during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology to review ongoing studies funded by grants from the National Rosacea Society and to foster increased scientific interest in rosacea research.

Medical Scientists Review Progress, Cite Need for More Rosacea Research

Medical researchers reviewed scientific progress in understanding the potential causes and other aspects of rosacea during a recent research workshop conducted by the National Rosacea Society. The well-attended session was held during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology to stimulate further rosacea research and broaden awareness of research grants now available from the National Rosacea Society.

New Study Links Swelling and Excessive Tissue

Growing evidence now confirms that rhinophyma, the excess growth of tissue on the nose that represents the most advanced stage of rosacea, is a result of the chronic lymphedema (swelling) that often appears in rosacea, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.1

What Causes Rosacea? Further Research Offers New Hope to Rosacea Sufferers

Although rosacea today can be controlled with long-term therapy, a cure has yet to be found and its cause is still unknown. Fortunately, growing interest among medical researchers now offers hope that the approximately 13 million Americans who suffer from rosacea will reap the benefits of new scientific insights into this embarrassing and potentially disfiguring disease.

First Research Grants Awarded To Advance Knowledge of Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society announced that the first research proposals have been selected for funding by its medical advisory board as part of the Society's new research grants program to encourage and support the advancement of scientific knowledge of rosacea and how to control it.

Laser Removes Visible Veins

A recent controlled study of laser therapy for rosacea found that the procedure substantially reduced visible blood vessels (telangiectasia) and also helped reduce redness (erythema) and flushing after an average of three treatments, according to results presented by Dr. S. M. Clark and colleagues of the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Wales, at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting.

Sun May Make Blood Vessels More Visible

Which came first, the chicken or the egg?

In rosacea, are visible dilated blood vessels -- called telangiectasia -- the result of damaged connective tissue, or is it the damaged blood vessels themselves that have a degrading effect on the connective tissue? Experts have discussed both possibilities.

Rosacea Linked with Increase in Migraine

Women with rosacea may be more likely to experience migraine headaches than those without rosacea, according to findings reported in the medical journal Dermatology.1

In a study of 809 randomly selected workers, Drs. M. Berg and S. Liden of the Department of Dermatology at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden reported that 14 percent had experienced migraine, and that it was significantly more common in women.

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Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.