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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Oily T-zone & Testing for Rosacea

Q. I have very large pores and am very oily in the "T" zone of my face. Is this common for rosacea sufferers?

A. There is no standard skin type for rosacea patients. Many sufferers experience dry, flaky skin, while others may have normal or oily skin. The key is to identify your skin type and use medication and skin-care products that are suitable for you.

For instance, topical treatments come in different formulations. Gel formulations are suitable for patients with normal to oily skin. Lotion formulations are a good choice for patients with normal to dry skin. Cream formulations may be especially suited for dry skin.

In addition to selecting the right topical formulation, rosacea patients should opt for skin-care products that work well with their skin types.

Q. Is there any kind of test that will tell you that you definitely have rosacea?

A. There are no histological, serological or other diagnostic tests for rosacea. A diagnosis of rosacea must come from your physician after a thorough examination of your signs and symptoms and a medical history. During your exam you should explain any problems you are having with your face, such as redness; the appearance of bumps or pimples; swelling; burning, itching or stinging; and other information.

 

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Readers of Rosacea Review are invited to submit Questions to the "Q & A" column, to be used as space permits. Address your Questions to:

Rosacea Review
196 James St.
Barrington, Illinois 60010

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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.