Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

diagnosis

Study Differentiates Rosacea from Sun Damage

A new study has documented for the first time the clinical differences between subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea – characterized by facial redness and, sometimes, visible blood vessels – and a condition with visible blood vessels from sun damage known as telangiectatic photoaging (TP), providing a clear picture of the differences between the two disorders and aiding in appropriate treatment.1

Lupus or Rosacea? Blood Test May Not Reveal Definitive Diagnosis

Could it be lupus – or could it be rosacea?

Lupus erythematosus – long known as an autoimmune disorder – and rosacea share several signs and symptoms: facial redness, sensitivity to sunlight and a tendency to affect women more than men. In fact, physicians have sometimes turned to blood tests to tell them apart. Now, researchers have discovered that those tests may not be as indicative as once thought.

Delayed Diagnosis Failed to Spoil Her Outcome

The signs and symptoms of rosacea can vary greatly from one patient to another, and sometimes the symptoms can be so unexpected that diagnosis is delayed. Such was the case for Terri Flynn, a 63-year-old part-time receptionist from Texas. Lacking the telltale facial signs of rosacea, Terri suffered through years of red, watery eyes before she finally learned she had rosacea.

"About 10 years ago, I started getting styes. I wore contacts, and my physician blamed it on that," Terri said. However, her doctor said he didn't normally treat styes.

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