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diagnosis

Lupus or Rosacea? Blood Test May Not Reveal Definitive Diagnosis

Could it be lupus – or could it be rosacea?

Lupus erythematosus – long known as an autoimmune disorder – and rosacea share several signs and symptoms: facial redness, sensitivity to sunlight and a tendency to affect women more than men. In fact, physicians have sometimes turned to blood tests to tell them apart. Now, researchers have discovered that those tests may not be as indicative as once thought.

Acne or Rosacea? Accurate Diagnosis Is Key to Treatment

Acne and rosacea can share common features, and accurate diagnosis is especially important because antibiotic resistance is a growing concern worldwide, according to Dr. Hilary Baldwin, associate professor of dermatology at the State University of New York-Brooklyn.1

Delayed Diagnosis Failed to Spoil Her Outcome

The signs and symptoms of rosacea can vary greatly from one patient to another, and sometimes the symptoms can be so unexpected that diagnosis is delayed. Such was the case for Terri Flynn, a 63-year-old part-time receptionist from Texas. Lacking the telltale facial signs of rosacea, Terri suffered through years of red, watery eyes before she finally learned she had rosacea.

"About 10 years ago, I started getting styes. I wore contacts, and my physician blamed it on that," Terri said. However, her doctor said he didn't normally treat styes.

Clinical Scorecard Offered to Physicians

A "Rosacea Clinical Scorecard," based on the recently published standard grading system for rosacea,1 has been developed by the NRS to aid physicians and researchers in diagnosing and evaluating rosacea in their patients, and assessing the results of therapy.

Q&A: Oily T-zone & Testing for Rosacea

Q. I have very large pores and am very oily in the "T" zone of my face. Is this common for rosacea sufferers?

A. There is no standard skin type for rosacea patients. Many sufferers experience dry, flaky skin, while others may have normal or oily skin. The key is to identify your skin type and use medication and skin-care products that are suitable for you.

Rosacea Diagnosis Now More Common

Once thought of as a rare mysterious malady, rosacea is now the fifth most common diagnosis made by dermatologists, according to figures recently published in Skin and Allergy News.

Although the frequency of rosacea diagnosis ranks only behind that of such well-known skin disorders as acne, dermatitis, psoriasis and actinic keratosis, it was not until recent years that rosacea has become widely identified as one of the most common dermatological conditions.

Dermatologists Make A Difference Battling Rosacea

You've been diagnosed with rosacea, but you're still confused -- perhaps you've tried certain medications to no avail, and you're not sure whether your facial redness and bumps are due to too much sun or to something you ate. You'd like to talk to someone to get some advice.

A dermatologist, a physician who specializes in dealing with the skin and its diseases, is the health-care professional best qualified to accurately diagnose your condition and determine the best course of medical treatment.

Q&A: Avoiding Triggers & Diagnosis Before Flare-up

Q. It seems the list of tripwires that might trigger rosacea flare-ups is endless, and now I am afraid to try anything. What should I do?

A. Numerous items have been identified by various rosacea sufferers as causing rosacea flare-ups in their particular cases. However, because each individual is unique, what causes a flare-up for one sufferer may not for another. Before you start avoiding everything, try keeping track of your daily activities and the corresponding condition of your rosacea to pinpoint and avoid exactly what seems to aggravate your particular case.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.