News Releases

Although the underlying cause or causes of rosacea have yet to be discovered, this unsightly and embarrassing condition can now be successfully controlled with medical therapy and lifestyle modifications to avoid those factors that may aggravate or trigger its signs and symptoms.

While sipping hot coffee, running laps or a day at the beach may cause the average person to flush harmlessly, such innocuous deeds can wreak havoc on the face of a rosacea sufferer. Because rosacea is characterized by flare-ups and remissions as it grows increasingly more severe, sufferers of this conspicuous and embarrassing disorder are advised to identify and avoid those factors that seem to aggravate their individual conditions.

CHICAGO (April 1, 2015)  Like a mosaic slowly gaining definition and becoming clear, so too is the scientific understanding of the potential causes of rosacea. April has been designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to educate the public on the warning signs of this chronic but treatable facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans. 

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 4, 2015) – While researchers continue to make progress in understanding the disease process of rosacea, lack of public awareness of the disorder remains a stumbling block to its control. The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to educate the public on the warning signs of this chronic and widespread facial condition now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

 

BARRINGTON, Illinois (January 22, 2015) -- The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced it has awarded funding for three new studies, in addition to continuing support for two ongoing studies, as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

CHICAGO (April 1, 2014) -- April has been designated Rosacea Awareness Month by the NRS to alert the public to the early warning signs of this conspicuous, red-faced disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 3, 2014) – The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to educate the public on the impact of this chronic and widespread facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (January 15, 2014) – The emotional impact of rosacea is often substantial regardless of subtype or severity, according to results of a new survey of 1,675 rosacea patients conducted by the National Rosacea Society. 

BARRINGTON, Illinois (November 12, 2013) – The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced it has awarded funding for two new studies, in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies during the year, as part of its research grants program.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (October 09, 2013) -- Although the progression of rosacea can vary substantially from one individual to another, flushing and persistent redness are by far the most common early signs of the disorder, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (September 4, 2013) – Residents of New England appear to suffer the highest incidence of rosacea in the United States, while those in Hawaii may be affected the least, according to a geographic analysis of National Rosacea Society (NRS) membership data. 

CHICAGO (April 1, 2013) – For many individuals with rosacea, every social occasion can feel like a minefield no matter how mild their condition, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). April has been designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the NRS to alert the public to the early warning signs of this chronic and conspicuous facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 1, 2013) – For individuals with rosacea, every social occasion can feel like a minefield, no matter how mild their condition. The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to alert the public to the early warning signs of this chronic and conspicuous facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

NORTH POLE (December 5, 2012) – Allegations that Santa Claus’ red nose and cheeks were due to drinking too much spiked eggnog were laid to rest today when the negative results of a blood alcohol test were released. “There was no alcohol in his blood,” stated the medical examiner. His test did, however, register unusually high levels of gingerbread and hot chocolate, officials reported.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (November 26, 2012) — The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced that it has awarded funding to five new studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (September 25, 2012) — While the conspicuous red face and blemishes of rosacea can be embarrassing enough, they tell only part of the story as a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) shows that significant physical discomfort often accompanies the visible signs of this widespread disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

CHICAGO (April 2, 2012) — While rosacea has become increasingly recognized as a common and conspicuous red-faced disorder, mounting evidence has shown that it can cause far more emotional stress and physical pain than previously known. April has been designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to alert the public to the warning signs of this chronic and often progressive condition now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 2, 2012) — Emotional stress and physical pain are among the invisible components of rosacea beyond its red-faced, conspicuous appearance, according to new patient surveys by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). The NRS has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to alert the public to the warning signs of this chronic and often life-disruptive facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (November 7, 2011) - The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced that it has awarded funding to three new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea, which is now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (June 1, 2011) — Unless effectively controlled, rosacea can play havoc on job interactions and employment, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) on the impact in the workplace of this red-faced, poorly understood disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

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Email:
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Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.