Press Room

New Study Shows Role for Bacteria in Development of Rosacea Symptoms

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (May 3, 2004) -- Researchers have successfully demonstrated a possible role for bacteria associated with microscopic mites -- known as Demodex folliculorum -- in the development of subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea, an increasingly common facial condition characterized by persistent redness with papules (bumps) and pustules (pimples), according to study results presented during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology here. It is estimated that rosacea affects more than 14 million Americans.

For Millions With Rosacea 'The Eyes Also Have It'

CHICAGO (March 1, 2004) -- Red or watery eyes go along with red faces for many of the estimated 14 million Americans with rosacea, adding to their discomfort and even threatening their vision if allowed to become severe. April has been designated Rosacea Awareness Month to alert the public to the early warning signs of this widespread and often embarrassing facial disorder, and to encourage those who may have this condition to seek medical help before it increasingly disrupts their daily lives.

National Rosacea Society Awards Research Grants to Study Widespread, Poorly Understood Disorder

BARRINGTON, Illinois (December 12, 2003) -- The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced that five new studies have been awarded funding as part of its research grants program to expand scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood dermatological disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

National Rosacea Society Offers New Consumer Booklet

BARRINGTON, Illinois (September 23, 2003) -- The National Rosacea Society has introduced the first consumer education booklet on rosacea that incorporates the new standard diagnostic criteria for this common but poorly understood facial disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans. The new diagnostic guidelines were developed by 17 rosacea experts worldwide, and published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

New Survey Pinpoints Spicy Foods That May Often Trigger Rosacea

BARRINGTON, Illinois (July 17, 2003) -- From hot peppers to horseradish, strong flavored fare may have no place on the plates of many people with rosacea. A new survey by the National Rosacea Society has identified a broad range of hot spicy foods that often trigger or aggravate this red-faced, acne-like facial disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans.

Rosacea Patients Seek Medical Help for Reasons Beyond Facial Appearance

BARRINGTON, Illinois (May 16, 2003) -- The common and often life-disruptive facial disorder known as rosacea is much more than a cosmetic problem and may require broader awareness within the medical community, according to a new patient survey by the National Rosacea Society. The red-faced, acne-like condition is now estimated to affect more than 14 million Americans.

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants to Study Common but Poorly Understood Disorder

BARRINGTON, Illinois (December 6, 2002) -- The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced that five new studies of rosacea have been awarded funding as part of its research grants program to expand scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood facial disorder, estimated to affect 14 million Americans.

Study Shows Sunlight May Affect Blood Vessels of Rosacea Patients

LOS ANGELES (September 23, 2002) -- Sun exposure appears to trigger a substance in the body that may lead to the visible blood vessels that often appear with rosacea, a conspicuous facial disorder now estimated to affect 14 million Americans, according to a study funded by the National Rosacea Society and reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology here.

First Standard System Introduced for Diagnosis and Study of Rosacea

BARRINGTON, Illinois (April 19, 2002) -- The National Rosacea Society announced today that it has introduced the first standard classification system for the diagnosis and study of rosacea, a widespread but poorly understood facial disorder estimated to affect 14 million Americans. A full report on the new system, developed by a consensus committee and reviewed by rosacea experts worldwide, has been published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

National Rosacea Society Awards Grants to Study Common but Little-Known Disorder

BARRINGTON, Illinois (December 12, 2001) -- The National Rosacea Society announced that four new studies of rosacea have been selected for funding as part of its research grants program to support the advancement of scientific knowledge of this poorly understood and often life-disruptive facial disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

New Study Links Warmth of Skin to Rosacea

WASHINGTON (June 25, 2001) -- The greater warmth of the facial skin of rosacea sufferers may play a role in triggering the unsightly papules (bumps) and pustules (pimples) often associated with this conspicuous facial disorder now estimated to affect 14 million Americans, according to a study funded by a grant from the National Rosacea Society and reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology here.