• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

triggers

Ingredients May Aggravate Rosacea

A survey of 1,023 rosacea patients by the National Rosacea Society identified types of skin-care products and ingredients that commonly pose problems for rosacea sufferers.

Survey Lists Wine as Top Alcohol Trigger

A new survey by the National Rosacea Society found that certain alcoholic beverages may affect rosacea more than others, while also dispelling the common myth that the condition is caused by heavy drinking.

In the survey of more than 700 rosacea patients, 10 percent of the respondents said they rarely or never drank alcohol, and an additional 10 percent reported that consuming alcoholic beverages had no affect on their disorder.

Household Cleaners and Chores Can Trigger Rosacea Flare-ups

A broad variety of common household tasks and products may aggravate rosacea in various individuals, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society. The survey of nearly 400 rosacea patients found that harsh chemicals in cleansers and tasks requiring strenuous physical exertion may help make the house sparkle, but they can also lead to rosacea flare-ups.

Survey Says Pack the Picnic Basket Without the Spicy Foods

If your rosacea is affected by certain spicy foods, they may have no place in your picnic basket this summer. It's not just the popular south-of-the-border cuisines that can lead to the red rash of rosacea in many individuals, but many other ingredients as well, according to a new survey of more than 500 rosacea patients by the National Rosacea Society.

New Survey Pinpoints Leading Factors that Trigger Symptoms

Without special precautions, you may be heading for a flare-up this summer as sun, stress and hot weather were cited as the most common rosacea tripwires in a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society. The survey of 1,066 rosacea patients provides the most comprehensive ranking to date of the multitude of things that may trigger or aggravate the signs and symptoms of rosacea in various individuals.

Rosacea Tripwires

In a new survey, rosacea patients cited the most common factors that triggered or aggravated their individual conditions.

Q&A: Missing Symptoms & Housebleaning Flare-up

Q. I was diagnosed with rosacea several years ago, but I've never had any visible blood vessels, bumps or pimples. I have eye irritation, and have only experienced some redness on my face. Is it possible for rosacea not to include its most common signs?

A. The signs and symptoms of rosacea can vary substantially from one patient to another, and may include various combinations of signs and symptoms.

Tips for Identifying Rosacea Triggers

Discovering and avoiding your own individual rosacea tripwires can be a challenge. While the list of lifestyle and environmental factors that may aggravate rosacea is long -- ranging from sun and wind to spicy foods, heavy exercise and hot baths -- not everyone is affected by them all. Here's how to pinpoint and avoid those potential rosacea triggers that may affect your individual case.

 

Rosacea Sufferers Can Enjoy Summer Without Rise in Flare-ups

For many, summer is the most awaited time of the year with its promise of sunny weather and outdoor activities. Yet for 14 million Americans with rosacea, it may be a season of despair unless special precautions are taken to prevent rosacea flare-ups.

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - triggers

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.