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triggers

Q&A: Treating Flare-Ups & Computer Use

Q. I keep seeing advice on how to prevent a flare-up, but not how to treat one. When I wake up in the morning and my face is covered in red bumps and pustules, is there any treatment that provides immediate relief?

Q&A: Sun Exposure & Vitamin D

Q. My flare-ups seem to be triggered primarily by sun exposure. Will a good sunscreen be enough to prevent flare-ups or must I always wear a hat when outside?

A. Because sun exposure is a leading flare-up trigger for so many, using sunscreen with an SPF (sun-protection factor) of 15 or higher is recommended for most rosacea patients all year-round -- but it is also important to avoid direct sunlight as much as possible.

Rosacea Trigger Aids Medical Research

The same biochemical process that causes people to flush when alarmed or embarrassed may be linked to the development of rosacea, according to findings presented by Dr. Richard Granstein, chairman of dermatology at Cornell University, during the recent Society for Investigative Dermatology annual meeting.

Careful Detective Work Helps Manage Rosacea

In addition to complying with medical therapy, an important part of managing rosacea for many patients is to identify and avoid environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger or aggravate their individual conditions.

Cinnamon Awareness

In a report of one patient, cinnamon was potentially linked to an increase in severity of the patient's rosacea, according to a report in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.1

Researchers Dr. Tracy Campbell and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago reported that a woman with diabetes and mild papulopustular rosacea on the nose experienced a sudden spread of symptoms from her eyelids to her chin after using 500-mg cinnamon supplements to help control blood sugar levels.

Scientists Trace Rosacea Triggers to Discover Sources of Symptoms

From exposure to heat to cigarette smoking, new studies are tracing the effects of rosacea triggers in the search for the cause or causes of this widespread, often life-disruptive disorder.

In interim results of a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society, Dr. Kent Keyser, professor of vision sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, noted that nicotine may be linked to the redness and visible blood vessels of rosacea.

Q&A: Tanning Beds & Caffeine

Q. Are tanning beds better or worse than the sun for rosacea patients?

A. In a National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey, sun exposure ranked as one of the most common rosacea triggers. At the same time, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has conducted a public awareness campaign to warn against the dangers of indoor tanning.

Exercise Can Affect Rosacea, But Modifying Routine Helps

According to a new survey of 1,261 rosacea patients by the National Rosacea Society, more than 83 percent are affected at least somewhat by exercise. Fortunately, of those who have modified their exercise routine because of this condition, 89 percent said this had reduced their signs and symptoms.

Hot Sauce, Wine and Tomatoes Cause Flare-ups, Survey Finds

If you wanted to create the meal most likely to cause a flare-up in someone with rosacea, there are a few things you'd want to be sure to include: hot sauce, tomatoes, wine and maybe some citrus. Then grill up some marinated meat, and include something with chocolate for dessert. These items were among the top rosacea triggers reported in a recent survey on foods and beverages by the National Rosacea Society.

Smart Sun Protection Keeps Flare-Ups Away

While many are aware that protection from sunlight is important to prevent skin cancer, rosacea patients have even further reason to minimize their exposure. In fact, beyond being the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups named by 81 percent of patients in a National Rosacea Society survey, researchers have found that sun exposure may be linked to the visible blood vessels (telangiectasia) often associated with rosacea.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.