survey

New Survey Pinpoints Leading Factors that Trigger Symptoms

Without special precautions, you may be heading for a flare-up this summer as sun, stress and hot weather were cited as the most common rosacea tripwires in a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society. The survey of 1,066 rosacea patients provides the most comprehensive ranking to date of the multitude of things that may trigger or aggravate the signs and symptoms of rosacea in various individuals.

Survey Reveals Rosacea Patients Often Have Other Skin Conditions

Rosacea patients may often suffer from other skin conditions in addition to dealing with the effects of their rosacea, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

"It's common for people to experience more than one skin condition, especially as they grow older," said Dr. James Del Rosso, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Nevada. "While the potential signs and symptoms of rosacea itself can be quite varied, it is important to consider the possibility of other skin disorders as well."

Eye Symptoms of Rosacea Often Left Undiagnosed, Survey Shows

A new survey by the National Rosacea Society suggests that common symptoms known as ocular rosacea, which can cause irritation or redness in the eyes of rosacea patients, may be significantly underdiagnosed.

Survey Shows How to Beat Kitchen Heat

With the holiday season coming up, many rosacea sufferers should take special precautions to prevent flare-ups when preparing festive meals, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Stress Control Cuts Rosacea Symptoms, According to New Patient Survey

While emotional stress is one of the leading causes of rosacea flare-ups, stress management can be highly effective in reducing its impact, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

In a survey of more than 700 rosacea patients, 91 percent reported that emotional stress caused or sometimes caused their rosacea to flare up. Stress reportedly led to frequent flare-ups for 45 percent of the survey respondents and occasional flare-ups for 42 percent. Only 10 percent indicated that stress rarely affected their rosacea.

Rosacea Sufferers Can Enjoy Summer Without Rise in Flare-ups

For many, summer is the most awaited time of the year with its promise of sunny weather and outdoor activities. Yet for 14 million Americans with rosacea, it may be a season of despair unless special precautions are taken to prevent rosacea flare-ups.

Survey Finds Facial Discomfort May Accompany Rosacea Symptoms

Beyond the effects of rosacea on facial appearance, the disorder is also frequently associated with facial discomfort, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Patients Over 50 Hardest Hit with Rosacea Symptoms

While rosacea has sometimes been described as affecting adults between the ages of 30 and 50, in actuality it may be just as common and even more severe after age 50.

Tags:

Survey Shows Rosacea Disrupts Work for Patients with Severe Symptoms

Severe rosacea symptoms often have a substantial impact on people's work lives, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of more than 700 rosacea patients, 66 percent of those with severe symptoms said rosacea had affected their professional interactions, and 33 percent had cancelled or postponed business meetings because of their appearance. Twenty-eight percent said they had missed work because of their condition, and 28 percent also said it may even have influenced their being chosen for a new job or promotion.

More Women Face Embarrassment from Conspicuous Effects of Rosacea

While in today's world women are increasingly recognized as equals to men, when it comes to rosacea many differences between the sexes appear to exist.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - survey

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.