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Q&A

Q&A: Pimples on Lips & Sweating

Q. I suffer from bumps or pimples that aggravate my lips. Is this caused by my rosacea?

Q&A: Mosquito Bite-like Flare-ups & Steroid Treatment

Q. Sometimes my rosacea flare-ups look like mosquito bites and itch. Is this common?

A. A rosacea flare-up is characterized by a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples. For some sufferers, the bumps caused by rosacea may resemble mosquito bites. For others, these bumps are generally redder in appearance. It is not uncommon for rosacea patients to itch from dry skin, which can be helped by using a moisturizer.

 

Q&A: Anxiety & Time from Trigger to Flare-up

Q. Can being anxious or nervous contribute to a rosacea flare-up? I do a lot of public speaking and find my face sometimes gets red and swollen before an engagement.

A. Since anxiety and nervousness are forms of emotional stress, it's quite likely that the anticipation of your speaking engagement could result in a rosacea flare-up. In a National Rosacea Society survey of 602 patients, 88 percent said their rosacea often or sometimes flares up when they are under emotional stress.

Q&A: Ears are Burning & Asymetrical Symptoms

Q. Sometimes my flushing is so severe, my ears feel hot and burn. Is this part of rosacea?

A. Rosacea patients flush more frequently than the general population, and in some cases this flushing might include the ears. Adults who are prone to blush and flush are at greater risk of developing rosacea, and prolonged flushing leading to persistent redness in the face is an early symptom.

Q&A: Having the Talk & Mild Case

Q. I have had rosacea for several years and now I've noticed that one of my cousins looks as though she has symptoms of the disease. How do you tell someone you think they have rosacea?

Q&A: Contagious? & Chlorine

Q. Is rosacea contagious?

A. No. Rosacea is not considered an infectious disease, and there is no evidence that it can be spread by contact with the skin or through inhaling airborne bacteria. The effectiveness of antibiotics against rosacea symptoms is believed to be due to their anti-inflammatory effect, rather than their ability to destroy bacteria.

Q&A: Best Place to Live & Skin Cancer

Q. As a rosacea sufferer, which region of the United States is best to live in to avoid tripwires related to weather and climate?

Q&A: Indoor Temperature & Dry, Flaky Skin

Q. Can indoor temperature affect my rosacea?

A. It is possible that indoor temperature could affect rosacea in certain cases, since anything that causes a sufferer to flush may have the potential to lead to a flare-up. Hot weather has been documented on surveys as a rosacea trigger for 53 percent of sufferers, and being "too warm" indoors can also induce flushing.

Q&A: Birth Control & Topical Medication

Q. Can rosacea be aggravated by birth control pills?

A. Nothing has been reported in the medical literature indicating that birth control pills may cause rosacea flare-ups. Later in life, however, some women find they develop rosacea during menopause because of the increase in flushing as their bodies undergo hormonal changes.

Q&A: Laser Surgery & Topical Medication Reapplication

Q. Will laser surgery get rid of telangiectasias (spider veins or tiny visible blood vessels)?

A. Laser surgery using a pulse dye or other laser can be an effective way to treat telangiectasias on the legs. For many sufferers, laser treatment can provide long-term relief from these unwanted spider veins.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.