• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

nose

Q&A: Chronic Nasal Blockage & Heredity

Q. Is there a link between chronic nasal blockage and rosacea?

A. Chronic nasal obstruction has many potential causes, and there is no evidence linking this condition to rosacea. Even patients with rhinophyma usually can breathe well through their noses. A typical stuffy nose is commonly associated with inflammation of the mucous membranes from various causes, often allergies or viruses.

Excess Tissue Can Be Successfully Treated with a Variety of Options

Although subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea often involves excess tissue, it can be effectively treated with a range of options appropriate for the severity of the case, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society.1

Her Red Nose Leads to Rosacea Diagnosis

As far back as she can remember, Carole Storme's red nose was a fact of life, especially during the holidays and at family gatherings. Photos clearly documented the condition, but her doctor attributed it to her Irish heritage.

"Every time I would ask why my nose turns red, he would just laugh and say, 'It's because you're Irish,' " she explained.

Rhinophyma: Rosacea at its Worst Can Be Treated

The unsightly redness, papules and pustules of rosacea can be controlled with medical therapy combined with lifestyle modifications. But untreated symptoms may progress to rhinophyma, a conspicuous condition that sometimes appears at the advanced stage of this common and embarrassing disorder. Most often occurring in men, rhinophyma is the red swollen nose often mistakenly attributed to heavy drinking, such as in the case of the late comedian W. C. Fields.

Subscribe to RSS - nose

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.