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New Study Shows Heat Increases Nerve Activity

New medical research into the process of facial flushing and redness has found that individuals with rosacea produce greater nerve, blood flow and sweating responses than people without the disorder when exposed to increased heat or stress.  Results of the National Rosacea Society-funded study also uncovered a role for the sympathetic nervous system, which controls the “fight or flight” response and other key involuntary functions such as heart rate, digestion, breathing and perspiration.

Heat Plays Role Even in Cold Winter Season

Heat often brings on the signs and symptoms of rosacea, and this can be a problem even in the frosty winter months, according to a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 424 rosacea patients.

Readers Suggest New Ways to Beat the Heat

With the arrival of spring and summer, the need to beat the heat grows even more urgent for the many rosacea sufferers whose symptoms are triggered by high temperatures. Beyond the many tried-and-true measures, readers have shared additional ideas for keeping your cool whether outdoors or inside.

Tips for a Great Summer Vacation

Advance planning makes any vacation more successful, so when you make your travel reservations, don't forget to plan strategies to keep your rosacea under control. The following suggestions can lead to a more enjoyable getaway.

 

  • Play it safe with prescriptions. You don't want to get stuck in a faraway place without your rosacea medication, so pack it in your carry-on bag in case your luggage is lost or delayed.

 

Tips for Avoiding Summer Flare-Ups

Summer can be a troublesome time for rosacea sufferers, as avoiding some of the most common rosacea triggers -- the sun, hot weather and humidity -- requires special attention. Follow these tips for a successful summer season.

 

  • Know your triggers. If you have identified the lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to your flare-ups, you have a better chance of controlling your condition.

 

Survey Shows How to Beat Kitchen Heat

With the holiday season coming up, many rosacea sufferers should take special precautions to prevent flare-ups when preparing festive meals, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Rosacea Sufferers Can Enjoy Summer Without Rise in Flare-ups

For many, summer is the most awaited time of the year with its promise of sunny weather and outdoor activities. Yet for 14 million Americans with rosacea, it may be a season of despair unless special precautions are taken to prevent rosacea flare-ups.

Tips for Surviving a Sizzling Summer

Most people look forward to hot summer days when they can soak in the sun and enjoy a variety of activities outdoors. But for many rosacea sufferers, summer fun can trigger unsightly flare-ups that inevitably put a chill on the season. Here are some precautions you can take:

  • Sun exposure is the most common rosacea tripwire, so wear sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 15 or higher every day -- even when it is overcast. If sunscreen irritates your skin, try a pediatric formulation.

Managing Rosacea as Temperatures Rise Aids Spring and Summer Survival

Unlike the lyrics in the Gershwin song, when it's "summertime" the living can be anything but easy for rosacea sufferers. Fortunately, while it's the season when rosacea tends to heat up just like the outdoors, most of these problems can be overcome with proper precautions.

In a National Rosacea Society survey of more than 700 rosacea patients, 71 percent said their condition was affected by changing seasons and 57 percent named summer as the time when their rosacea is at its worst.

Survey Reports Sun Season Hardest on Rosacea Symptoms

With spring blossoming and summer approaching, a majority of rosacea sufferers may find they must take special precautions to avoid flare-ups, according to a survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of more than 700 rosacea sufferers, 71 percent said their condition was affected by changes in seasons. Of all the seasons, summer was found the hardest to endure by most, with 57 percent of the respondents reporting that their symptoms are at their worst during this time of year.

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Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.