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bumps and pimples

Q&A: Triggers & Painful Bump

Q.  Certain activities trigger mild, short-lasting rosacea outbreaks on my cheeks and/or nose.  The outbreaks are not severe enough to make me stop these activities, but if I keep doing them could the flare-ups get worse?

A.  This aspect of potential rosacea triggers has not been studied, so it is unclear whether repeated exposure makes subsequent flare-ups worse.  Physicians have observed, however, that the signs and symptoms of rosacea tend to become increasingly severe without medical treatment and proper care.

Subtype 2 Rosacea Common in Tunisia

An analysis of hospital data in Tunisia found that subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea, characterized by redness with bumps and pimples, was the most commonly diagnosed form of rosacea in this Arab North African nation.1

Q&A: Rosacea on Lips & What is Granulomatous Rosacea?

Q. Can rosacea be on the lips as well? If so, what can be done to treat them?

A. There have been no reports in the medical literature of rosacea on the lips, although the bumps and pimples of rosacea may appear around the mouth. This can be treated with standard therapy for rosacea.

Another common disorder called perioral dermatitis may also occur around the mouth, and is associated with small bumps, as well as scaling and peeling. This condition can often be effectively controlled with appropriate treatment.

Study Finds Allergy-Like Reaction May Trigger Bumps and Pimples

The bumps (papules) and pimples (pustules) of rosacea, a widespread facial disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans, in some instances may be the result of an allergy-like reaction to environmental and emotional triggers, according to new study results presented at the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research workshop during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The seventh annual NRS workshop was attended by more than 130 medical scientists from around the world.

New Study Links Warmer Skin to Rosacea Bumps and Pimples

The greater warmth of the facial skin of rosacea sufferers may play a role in triggering the unsightly bumps and pimples that are common signs of this disorder, according to a new study funded by a grant from the National Rosacea Society and reported at the recent annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

Q&A: Pimples on Lips & Sweating

Q. I suffer from bumps or pimples that aggravate my lips. Is this caused by my rosacea?

Q&A: Mosquito Bite-like Flare-ups & Steroid Treatment

Q. Sometimes my rosacea flare-ups look like mosquito bites and itch. Is this common?

A. A rosacea flare-up is characterized by a more intense outbreak of redness, bumps or pimples. For some sufferers, the bumps caused by rosacea may resemble mosquito bites. For others, these bumps are generally redder in appearance. It is not uncommon for rosacea patients to itch from dry skin, which can be helped by using a moisturizer.

 

Doctors Unmask Rosacea Impostors to Formulate Appropriate Therapy

While a host of conditions can cause symptoms that may superficially resemble rosacea, dermatologists are increasingly able to pinpoint this widespread disorder and any concurrent conditions in order to tailor appropriate therapy for the individual patient. Proper diagnosis of rosacea can be especially important, since treatments for similar-appearing conditions can often make rosacea worse.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.