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NRS Funds Five New Rosacea Studies

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for five new studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Q&A: Ear Involvement & Intestinal Bacteria

Q. My ears have been weeping and draining for three years. I was diagnosed with ocular and regular rosacea a year ago. Is there such a thing as inner ear rosacea?

A. Rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, but it may also occur on the skin of other parts of the body such as the neck, chest, scalp or ears. However, there is not good evidence in medical literature linking rosacea to symptoms of the inner ear.

Threat of Bacterial Resistance Can Be Minimized in Rosacea

Improper use of oral antibiotics, including long-term use over months to years, has resulted in resistant bacteria that are posing a serious health threat, according to Dr. Theodore Rosen, professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine, at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. He also noted that alternative options are available that can minimize this risk.

NRS-Funded Studies Advance Knowledge of Rosacea's Causes

Many of the factors considered potential causes of rosacea are now coming into sharp focus as a result of medical studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grants program, and the growing body of scientific evidence is making major strides toward defining the precise development of this widespread disorder.

Study Shows Mite-Related Bacteria May Induce Rosacea Bumps, Pimples

Although they are normal inhabitants of human skin and cannot be seen, microscopic mites known as Demodex folliculorum may actually be something to blush about, as a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society demonstrated for the first time that these invisible organisms may be a cause or exacerbating factor in rosacea.1

Bacteria in Mites May Cause Rosacea

In a preliminary study presented during a poster session at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting this year, Dr. Richard Burroughs and colleagues of Walter Reed Army Medical Center noted antibiotics may be effective in treating rosacea because of their action against yet-to-be identified bacteria.

Medical Scientists Report Advances in Uncovering Mysteries of Rosacea

Researchers reported on continuing progress in the study of potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea during the National Rosacea Society's fourth annual research workshop, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

H. pylori May Not Be a Rosacea Factor

A recent study suggested that treatment of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium associated with peptic ulcers and other gastric disorders, may benefit the often small portion of rosacea patients who harbor this infection. However, another study has found that H. pylori itself does not appear to be a major factor.

Research Grants Awarded to Find Causes of Poorly Understood Disorder

The National Rosacea Society announced that four new studies of rosacea have been selected for funding as part of its research grants program to encourage and support the advancement of scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood facial disorder.

"We are pleased that the number of grant applications has continued to increase since the awarding of the first grants from this important new program last year," said Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the Society's medical advisory board, which reviewed and selected the grant applications for funding.

First Research Grants Awarded To Advance Knowledge of Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society announced that the first research proposals have been selected for funding by its medical advisory board as part of the Society's new research grants program to encourage and support the advancement of scientific knowledge of rosacea and how to control it.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.