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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Ears are Burning & Asymetrical Symptoms

Q. Sometimes my flushing is so severe, my ears feel hot and burn. Is this part of rosacea?

A. Rosacea patients flush more frequently than the general population, and in some cases this flushing might include the ears. Adults who are prone to blush and flush are at greater risk of developing rosacea, and prolonged flushing leading to persistent redness in the face is an early symptom.

When flushing occurs, the blood vessels in the face dilate and allow an increase in blood flow. Many patients complain that this triggers a hot or burning sensation. Vascular areas such as the cheeks, nose, forehead, chin and ears can be affected.

 

Q. My rosacea symptoms have always been more concentrated on the left side of my face. Are rosacea symptoms generally asymmetrical?

A. Rosacea patients may exhibit varying levels of severity of symptoms over different areas of the face. Patients have often reported that the disorder actually began with a red spot or patch on one cheek or another part of the face, and then spread to other areas.

On the other hand, many rosacea patients exhibit similar symptoms on both sides of their faces. Rosacea can present itself in different ways for different individuals.

 

Submit a Question
Readers of Rosacea Review are invited to submit Questions to the "Q & A" column, to be used as space permits. Address your Questions to:

Rosacea Review
800 South Northwest Highway, Suite 200
Barrington, Illinois 6001

 

 

 
 

 

 

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Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.