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ears

Q&A: Ear Involvement & Intestinal Bacteria

Q. My ears have been weeping and draining for three years. I was diagnosed with ocular and regular rosacea a year ago. Is there such a thing as inner ear rosacea?

A. Rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, but it may also occur on the skin of other parts of the body such as the neck, chest, scalp or ears. However, there is not good evidence in medical literature linking rosacea to symptoms of the inner ear.

Q&A: Contacts and Ocular Rosacea & Burning Ears

Q.Is it safe for someone with ocular rosacea to wear contact lenses?

A. Anyone with ocular rosacea should consult their physician about the safety of wearing contact lenses in their particular case. Depending on the individual, the symptoms of ocular rosacea may make wearing contact lenses problematic.

Rosacea Signs May Be Common Beyond the Face

Skin signs of rosacea outside the central face may be more common than is widely recognized, according to a new study presented by Dr. Joel Bamford, associate professor of family practice, University of Minnesota - Duluth, during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

"Almost everyone thinks of rosacea as being a facial condition," Dr. Bamford said. Yet, in a study of 94 patients with rosacea, he found that 42 to 84 percent showed skin signs beyond the face.

Q&A: Ears are Burning & Asymetrical Symptoms

Q. Sometimes my flushing is so severe, my ears feel hot and burn. Is this part of rosacea?

A. Rosacea patients flush more frequently than the general population, and in some cases this flushing might include the ears. Adults who are prone to blush and flush are at greater risk of developing rosacea, and prolonged flushing leading to persistent redness in the face is an early symptom.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.