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winter

Q&A: Winter Rosacea & Ocular Rosacea and Contacts

Q. Although I have rosacea, the symptoms only appear in the winter, not during the summer. Is it possible to have "winter rosacea"?

A. While many rosacea patients are affected by environmental factors that change with the seasons, what affects one person may not affect another. It may be that you are particularly sensitive to wind or frigid weather and these winter elements aggravate your rosacea.

Key Steps Can Soothe Dry Eye in Winter

If you're bothered by irritation, burning or a gritty feeling and redness in your eyes, you're not alone. Winter can bring a host of special challenges for rosacea patients, and the effects of dry eye head the list for many.

"Millions of people suffer from dry eye, and it accounts for 17 percent of all ophthalmologic visits," said Dr. Marian Macsai, chairman of ophthalmology at Northwestern University. "We definitely see more of it during the winter months because of the dryness of the environment, and it often accompanies rosacea."

Tips for Coping with Winter Weather

Some surprises may be welcome during the winter months, but others you want to avoid at all costs -- like rosacea flare-ups. Truth be told, managing rosacea can be especially tricky this time of year, due to many factors. Here are some ways to keep your cool:

 

  • Take care of yourself. Be sure to eat right, rest, exercise, plan sensibly, delegate and leave time to relax. Don't forget to use your "Rosacea Diary" to identify your personal triggers.

     

Winter Can Challenge People with Rosacea

Whether you live in the north woods of Wisconsin or the milder weather states of the South, the winter months can be especially challenging for people with rosacea. Various factors -- from wind and cold to sun exposure, indoor heat and low humidity -- all rank high on the list of common triggers for rosacea flare-ups.

Q&A: Eyes in Winter & Pregnancy

Q. Rosacea seems to affect my eyes more in the winter. Is there anything I can do?

A. Wind and cold temperatures may cause irritation and increase the watery discharge associated with ocular rosacea (eye symptoms)1. Besides limiting time outdoors during winter, patients with ocular rosacea can protect their eyes from icy blasts by wearing ultraviolet protective glasses or sunglasses.

'Tis the Season for Winter Flare-ups

The redness of rosacea can be an uninvited guest for the holidays whether you live in icy Minnesota or sun-filled San Diego. From a blast of arctic air to the heat of the kitchen, the winter months pose a host of special conditions that can worsen rosacea symptoms unless precautions are taken.

Winter Hard on the Eyes of Ocular Rosacea Patients

Winter conditions may be particularly harsh on patients with ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Guy Webster, associate professor of dermatology at Thomas Jefferson University Medical College in Philadelphia. He noted that eye symptoms of rosacea seem to worsen during this season, perhaps because of the frequent gusty winds and cold temperatures.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.