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vacation

Tips for Saying Bon Voyage to Vacation Rosacea Flare-Ups

Sure, you'll suspend your mail delivery and find a pet sitter, but you should also be sure to plan your trip with rosacea in mind. Depending on your individual sensitivities, the following suggestions can help lead to a much more enjoyable getaway.

 

  • Culprit #1. Avoid sun exposure, which affects more than 80 percent of rosacea sufferers. Minimize exposure from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. When you do venture out, use a UVA sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. For sensitive skin, try a pediatric formulation or moisturizer mixed with sunscreen.

     

Tips for Controlling Rosacea on Vacation

For most people, taking a summer vacation is a pleasant break from their normal routines. However, rosacea sufferers must be sure to continue their daily efforts to control this chronic and often relapsing condition. Here are some tips for enjoying your getaway, while keeping your rosacea in check.

Sufferers Can't Take Vacation from Steps to Prevent Flare-ups

Your skin looks great and you want to pack light, but before you zip your suitcase make sure you pack any rosacea medication prescribed by your physician, along with a mild cleanser, sunscreen and a hat to shield your face from the sun. Although you can leave town, there is no "taking a vacation" from rosacea.

Successfully managing this chronic disorder -- often characterized by remissions and flare-ups -- usually requires consistent long-term medical therapy as well as lifestyle changes to avoid factors that may aggravate the condition.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.