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Heat Plays Role Even in Cold Winter Season

Heat often brings on the signs and symptoms of rosacea, and this can be a problem even in the frosty winter months, according to a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 424 rosacea patients.

Tips for Coping with Changing Seasons

For many the coming of fall and winter means strong winds and colder temperatures, both of which can wreak havoc on the sensitive skin of rosacea patients. Even those who live in more moderate climates need to be prepared for sudden weather changes that can bring on a flare-up. Here are some tips to help you through the season:

 

Rosacea Patients Cite Summer as Season for Most Aggravations

While people often consider the warm weather and endless sun of summer true delights, new survey results suggest that many rosacea patients are likely to describe the season in much less glowing terms.

Nearly 85 percent of the 1,190 respondents to a recent National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey said their condition is affected by the change in seasons, and almost half said their symptoms are at their worst when the warm weather arrives. Forty-six percent also said they have to make the most lifestyle adjustments during this time to reduce the likelihood of a flare-up.

Q&A: Discovering Triggers & Cold Weather

Q. I can't seem to identify any specific rosacea triggers. What is the best way to find what might be bothering my condition?

A. There are a great many lifestyle and environmental factors that may trigger or aggravate rosacea signs and symptoms in various individuals. However, none seems to affect everyone. To identify and then avoid any rosacea triggers you may have, try tracking your condition for several weeks using a patient diary checklist from the National Rosacea Society as your guide.

Q&A: Seasonal Rosacea & Severity with Aging

Q. My rosacea seems to get worse in the fall and spring. Why would this be so?

Winter Hard on the Eyes of Ocular Rosacea Patients

Winter conditions may be particularly harsh on patients with ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Guy Webster, associate professor of dermatology at Thomas Jefferson University Medical College in Philadelphia. He noted that eye symptoms of rosacea seem to worsen during this season, perhaps because of the frequent gusty winds and cold temperatures.

Q&A: Indoor Temperature & Dry, Flaky Skin

Q. Can indoor temperature affect my rosacea?

A. It is possible that indoor temperature could affect rosacea in certain cases, since anything that causes a sufferer to flush may have the potential to lead to a flare-up. Hot weather has been documented on surveys as a rosacea trigger for 53 percent of sufferers, and being "too warm" indoors can also induce flushing.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.